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Grüebelsucht and other foreign words beginning with G

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Ian Dunn
403703.  Sun Sep 07, 2008 3:27 pm Reply with quote

This thread is dedicated to all those words found abroad for things we don't have words for. The German word Grüebelsucht is a quite interesitng example and one rather appropriate for QI, as it means, "an obsession in which even the simplest facts are compulsively queried.

Other "G" words from abroad include:


  • gayat - Feeling dizzy while looking down from a high place. (Malaysian)
  • gagrom - To search fro a thing below the water by trampling. (Boro, India)
  • Geisterfahrer - A person driving on the wrong side of the road. (German)
  • Gurtmuffel - Someone who doesn't wear a seat belt. (German)
  • gaton gaton - The sound of trains rattling along the line. (Japanese)
  • gorogoro - To spend time doing nothing (including lolling n a recumbent position) (Japanese)
  • guzuguzu - To vacillate, procratinate or to stretch out a job. (Japanese)
  • geragas - To come one's hair in anger. (Malay)
  • goaski - One's mother's elder sisters. (Sami, Northern Scandinavia)
  • gosh-pech - Twisting the ears of a schoolboy as a punishment. (Persian)
  • geshtenjapjeks - A street vendor of roast chestnuts. (Albanian)
  • grilagem - The old practice of putting a cricket in a box of newly faked documents, until the moving insect's excrement makes the papers look plausibly old and genuine (literally, cricketing). (Brazilian Portuguese)
  • gorrero - A person who always allows others to pay. (Spanish, Central America)
  • gusa - To decapitate with a sword. (Japanese)
  • geragal - A hook for catching crocodiles. (Malay)
  • Gummiadler - Tough roast chicken (literally, rubber eagle). (German)
  • giomlaireachd - The habit of dropping in at meal times. (Scottish Gaelic)
  • gohan - Rice that is ready for eating. Can also mean "Meal". (Japanese)
  • geiin suru - To drink like a whale. (Japanese)
  • Gesundheit - Health to you (What to say to a German who sneezes)
  • gyuho - An ox's walk (A snail's pace). (Japanese)
  • gurgurshaa - A docile pack-camel suitable for carrying delicate items. (Somalian)
  • guran - A herd of camels no longer producing milk that is kept away from dwelling areas. (Somalian)
  • gulguuluc - The low bellow of a camel when it is sick or thirsty. (Somalian)
  • guree - To make room for a person to sit on a loaded camel. (Somalian)
  • gja gja - The driving call to horses. (Bulgarian)
  • greann - The hair bristling as on an enraged dog. (Scottish Gaelic)
  • gou gou - The noise made by a cockerel. (Chinese)
  • gagak - The noise made by a crow. (Indonesian)
  • gut-gut-gudak - The noise made by hens. (Turkish)
  • gumusservi - Moonlight shining on water. (Turkish)
  • gulum - A stone falling into a well. (Tulu, India)
  • gulugulu - Filling a pitcher with water. (Tulu, India)
  • gitaigo - Words that try to imitate not just sounds, but states of feeling. (Japanese)
  • gatcha gatcha - An annoying noise. (Japanese)
  • geragera - A belly laugh. (Japanese)
  • ghiqq - The sound made by a boiling kettle. (Persian)
  • glas wen - A smile that is insincere and mocking. (literally, blue smile) (Welsh)
  • gelb vor Eifersucht werden - To become yellow with jealousy. (German)
  • gul och blå - Yellow and blue (similar to "Black and blue") (Swedish)
  • gande - The distance between two outstretched arms. (Zarma Western Africa)
  • Gurbansoltan-eje - April under the late President Niyazov of Turkmenistan.
  • Germinal - Seeds sprouting: One of the months under the French calender between 1793 and 1806. Nicknamed "Flowery" by the British
  • Guedado - Wanted by nobody. (Boy's name in Fulani, Mali)


Source: The Meaning of Tingo by Adam Jacot de Boinod (Former QI elf).

 
bobwilson
403772.  Sun Sep 07, 2008 6:46 pm Reply with quote

gayat - isn't that vertigo?

gagrom - seems a bit specialised

gorogoro - idling?

gorrero - freeloader? (and a few other terms)

Gesundheit - either health or bless you depending on context

gou gou - cock-a-doodle-doo

gagak - scrawk

gut-gut-gudak - heeelp

gulum - splosh

gulugulu - glug glug glug

gatcha gatcha - Any Labour politician speaking

gande - two yards (trad)

Guedado - politician

 
Stefan Linnemann
404089.  Mon Sep 08, 2008 11:42 am Reply with quote

Has anyone as yet come up with a good English equivalent of the Dutch word:

Gezellig?

Stefan.

 
HakunaMatata
404094.  Mon Sep 08, 2008 11:51 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Has anyone come up with a good English equivalent of the Dutch word:

Gezellig?


The closest I can think of is 'cosy' or 'pleasantly comfortable', however I don't think it can be accurately translated.

Someone may be able to correct me on this.

 
AlmondFacialBar
404166.  Mon Sep 08, 2008 2:25 pm Reply with quote

it should be grübelsucht without an "e" unless you're writing in a swiss accent. it's also a word i've never heard in my entire little life, maybe it's more southern or something. and when you don't go yellow with eifersucht, but with neid (envy). ;-)

i saw that book at my usually not very impressive local bookstore the other day. will have to get it. :-D

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Ian Dunn
404173.  Mon Sep 08, 2008 2:41 pm Reply with quote

AlmondFacialBar wrote:
i saw that book at my usually not very impressive local bookstore the other day. will have to get it. :-D


Indeed you should, seeing as how an ex-elf wrote the book. It is quite an interesting read.

 
Dix
405927.  Thu Sep 11, 2008 3:05 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
This thread is dedicated to all those words found abroad for things we don't have words for. The German word Grüebelsucht is a quite interesitng example and one rather appropriate for QI, as it means, "an obsession in which even the simplest facts are compulsively queried.

Other "G" words from abroad include:

  • gelb vor Eifersucht werden - To become yellow with jealousy. (German)
  • gul och blå - Yellow and blue (similar to "Black and blue") (Swedish)


These two "words" have literal - or almost literal, give or take a colour - translations, so they are not really something there is no word for in English.

Keeping the current letter, how about Grænsegænger (Danish) - a person who works in the country but who lives abroad. (literally border-walking person). It's a legal term to do with taxation rules.

I know another really good one, but it belongs in the F series: Fætter (Danish) - male cousin.

Dix

 
AlmondFacialBar
405929.  Thu Sep 11, 2008 3:13 pm Reply with quote

Dix wrote:
Keeping the current letter, how about Grænsegænger (Danish) - a person who works in the country but who lives abroad. (literally border-walking person). It's a legal term to do with taxation rules.

I know another really good one, but it belongs in the F series: Fætter (Danish) - male cousin.

Dix


both words exist in german, and look and sound almost exactly the same. it's grenzgaenger und vetter, only vetter is a bit old-fashioned.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
Ian Dunn
446562.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 9:38 am Reply with quote

I recently got Adam Jacot de Boinod's sequel to The Meaning of Tingo called Toujours Tingo. Here are some more "G" words.


  • geop - Fast talk which is mostly unintelligible. (Gaelic)
  • gugbe janjou - A stupid person trying to be clever. (Tibetan)
  • gegemena - To mutter while sobbing. (Rukwangali, Namibia)
  • gezelling - An atmosphere of cosiness, of being with friends, and spending time together laughing and having fun; the kind of moments that create memories. (Dutch)
  • gigirhi-gigirhi - To go from village to village exchanging gossip. (Tsonga, South Africa)
  • gida - To jump up and down constantly in one place as a form of dance. (Sout African Township)
  • gamadj - Dancing with a scalp in one's hands, in order to receive some presents. (Ojibway, North America)
  • gemas - A feeling of finding something or somebody so cute that you want to squeeze or pinch it. (Indonesian)
  • gattara - A woman, often old and lonley, who devotesherself to stray cats. (Italian)
  • gagung - A man who has no woman because of the inequality of the gender ratio. (Cantonese)
  • gintawan - The energy and industry of the first wife (when he husband takes an additional wife) as a result of the competition from the second wife. (Manobo, Philippines)
  • gila talak - A husband or wife who are divorced yet wishing very much to reunite. (Malay)
  • goagoana - To shout at each other in play. (Setswana, Botswana)
  • gigil - The gritting of the teeth when controlling emotion. (Tagalog, Philippines)
  • gwilgat - To watch from the corner of one's eye. (Breton, France)
  • gejigeji-mayuge - Bushy eyebrows. (Japanese)
  • giri-giri - The place where two or three hairs stick up no matter what. (Hawaiian Pidgin)
  • geu - To thrust one's hand into a bag. (Bugotu, Solomon Islands)
  • gamaza - To take with the fingertips. (Arabic)
  • gutόl - Snipping with the fingertips. (Tagalog, Philippines)
  • gobō - A penis that is large and tubular. (Japanese)
  • gállot - A shoe made out of hide taken from the head of a reindeer. (Sami, North Scandinavia)
  • gembelengan - Moving around without any certain direction. (Indonesian)
  • gobray - To fall into a well unknowingly. (Boro, India)
  • gadngád - Falling on one's nose. (Tagalog, Philippines)
  • gabkhron - To be afriad of witnessing an adventure. (Boro, India)
  • galungkung - The rattling sound produced by a loosely botled car. (Maguindanaon, Philippines)
  • gagjom - To set up a roadblock and then rob someone. (Tibetan)
  • geitonopoulo/geitonopoula - The boy/girl next door. (Greek)
  • Gemütlichkeit - The particular quality of cosiness you can ever feel at home. (German)
  • Giftschrank - A cupboard where things are kept that may only be lent out to someone with special permission. (German)
  • gagula - To take food without permission, showing a lack of good manners. (Tsonga, South Africa)
  • gargalacar - To drink from the bottle. (Portuguese)
  • gonets - One sent to buy alcohol for friends. (Russian)
  • gardziiba - An astrologist or a person in charge of the cups and dishes during parties. (Tibetan)
  • greadan - Spending a considerable time and giving all one's might to anything. (Gaelic)
  • guzu guzu suru - Being slow when you have something you should be doing; a half-wakeful sleep, especially in the morning when you have sort of woken up but are still playing with your dreams. (Japanese)
  • gigigigigi To stand about dispresed and all looking intently at something in the distance as cattle seeing a lion. (Tsonga, South Africa)
  • gansuthi - The first-grown feather of a bird's wing. (Boro, India)
  • gokuradiya - The water in a hole made by a cow's hoof. (Sinhala, Sri Lanka)
  • gagau - An elephant picking up with its trunk. (Malay)
  • glukocharazo - To glow in the dawn light. (Greek)
  • greigh - The uncommon heat of the sun after bursting out from behind a cloud. (Gaelic)
  • gaji buta - Getting paid without having to work. (Malay)
  • gujrī - A roadside market set up in the late afternoon. (Hindi)
  • gabinta - A dog that barks or snarls at intruders. (Japanese)
  • gokiburi - Policemen on motorcycles, who can follow burglars over pavements and through parks. (Japanese)
  • gbaa ose - To rub in pepper by way of punishment or torture. (Igbo, Nigeria)
  • gazi - A plundering raid in whcih at least forty camels are employed. (Mauritanian dialect)
  • Gleichgültigkeit - The feeling of dreadful moral insensibility and detachment which is a peculiar legacy of wars. (German)

 
bobwilson
446579.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 10:05 am Reply with quote

gida - To jump up and down constantly in one place as a form of dance. (Sout African Township) = "pogoing"

gembelengan - Moving around without any certain direction. (Indonesian) = "bummeling" or "bimbling" (see Jerome K Jerome's "Three men on the bummel"

 
Moosh
446630.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 11:27 am Reply with quote

geop - Fast talk which is mostly unintelligible. (Gaelic) = gabble or babble

Lots of these are just onomatopoeias, and so don't really count, eg gaton gaton, gou gou, gagak, gut-gut-gudak, gulum, gulugulu, etc...

 
Ian Dunn
446633.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 11:35 am Reply with quote

Moosh wrote:
Lots of these are just onomatopoeias, and so don't really count, eg gaton gaton, gou gou, gagak, gut-gut-gudak, gulum, gulugulu, etc...


Why don't they count? They are all words for things that we don't have in English.

 
Moosh
446641.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 11:54 am Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
Moosh wrote:
Lots of these are just onomatopoeias, and so don't really count, eg gaton gaton, gou gou, gagak, gut-gut-gudak, gulum, gulugulu, etc...


Why don't they count? They are all words for things that we don't have in English.


Well, firstly for most of the ones I mentioned, bobwilson has already provided an equivalent English word.

But when I said they don't count, I should really have said they don't count as being interesting. It's interesting that Turkish has a specific word for "moonlight shining on water", but the majority of languages have onomatopoeic words for bird calls, so Indonesian crows going "gagak" isn't interesting.

 
bobwilson
446845.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 7:53 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
gujrī - A roadside market set up in the late afternoon. (Hindi)


plus - there's no word for a "roadside market set up in the late afternoon" in English because there aren't any roadside markets set up in the late afternoon.

 
bobwilson
446846.  Thu Nov 27, 2008 7:56 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
gonets - One sent to buy alcohol for friends. (Russian)


I like this one though - we used to refer to that person as "my sister's boyfriend who's 18 and will get us booze"

 

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