View previous topic | View next topic

G: Guns, guns, guns

Page 7 of 9
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

suze
416175.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 3:38 pm Reply with quote

Good point!

It turns out that design work on the weapon actually began as far back as 1944, and the Red Army did indeed have its first few AK-47s in 1947. At that time they were individually made; mass production and rollout across the Soviet armed forces followed in 1949.

AK stands for Автомат Калашникова (Awtomat Kalasznikowa).

 
Dr. Know
416177.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 3:39 pm Reply with quote

is the latter spelled phoentically?

 
suze
416185.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 4:02 pm Reply with quote

There are several ways to transliterate from Russian into the Roman alphabet; the one which I tend to use (admittedly, this is because it's the one that I find easiest to understand) is based on Polish spelling.

Using "BBC phonetics", it would be something like "af-TOM-ut kal-ASH-ni-KOH-va". (I think; Russian stress is unpredictable and I've rather guessed that the words are stressed as they would be in Polish.)

 
Sadurian Mike
416201.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 5:00 pm Reply with quote

suze wrote:
Using "BBC phonetics", it would be something like "af-TOM-ut kal-ASH-ni-KOH-va". (I think; Russian stress is unpredictable and I've rather guessed that the words are stressed as they would be in Polish.)

That sounds right; certainly the AK-47 (and AK-74) assault rifles are known as "Kalashnikovs" in the West after the designer, Mikhail Kalashnikov.

An assault rifle is a fully or semi-automatic small arm that fires a rifle calibre round, but is designed to be the individual weapon of an infantryman, as opposed to either the less powerful round of a submachinegun (SMG), or the fire support ability of the light machine gun (LMG).

The AK-47 was not the first Russian assault rifle; in 1913 an automatic rifle was developed by a Captain Federov, known as the Fedorov Avtomat. It was only manufactured in small numbers, mainly (it is believed) because of the chaos and disruption of the Russian Revolution and subsequent Civil War.

There is strong evidence that Kalashnikov's AK-1 (the 1944 prototype that eventually led to the AK-47) was based on the German Sturmgewehr 44 (StG44), something he always strenuously denied.

Here's the two weapons, what do you think?


German StG44


AK-47


Last edited by Sadurian Mike on Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:06 pm; edited 1 time in total

 
Celebaelin
416205.  Wed Oct 01, 2008 5:13 pm Reply with quote

It would depend on the firing mechanism really - is that of the StG44 as simple as the AK?

 
Sadurian Mike
416694.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:04 pm Reply with quote

Celebaelin wrote:
It would depend on the firing mechanism really - is that of the StG44 as simple as the AK?

They are mechanically different but very similar in overall design. The argument is that Kalashnikov was inspired by the StG44 to create the AK-1 but (in a typically Russian manner) decided that the usual over-engineering of the rather delicate German mechanism could be simplified considerably. Hence the AK-1 has often been described as a Russified StG44.

It is this simplicity and ruggedness that has made the AK series so popular; it is easy to maintain and practically indestructable even by untrained troops. Compare this with the British Army's first issue SA-80 L85 IW and L86 LSW which worked well until they got dirty....

 
Dr. Know
416710.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:07 pm Reply with quote

speaking of what inspired what, I always forget if the bazooka inspired the panzershrek or the other way around.

 
Sadurian Mike
416728.  Thu Oct 02, 2008 4:30 pm Reply with quote

The Panzerschrek (official name Raketenpanzerbüchsen, or "Rocket Tank Rifle", thankfully abbreviated to RPzB) was inspired by the 60mm M9A1 "Bazooka", examples of which were captured either from the Americans in North Africa (Tunisia) or from those supplied to the Russians under Lend-Lease.

The Panzerschrek was a more powerful weapon than the 60mm Bazooka with a heavier warhead, but it had a consequently shorter range.

German designers saw that the rocket system was a drawback (the burning projectile of the Panzerschrek created a lot of smoke, leading to its German nickname of the "Stovepipe") and went on to develop the Panzerfaust, which was effectively a one-shot early smoothbore recoiless rifle* and led to a great deal of post-war antitank weapons development.


*They are called recoiless rifles despite the fact that the barrels of such weapons are not rifled.

 
Eric the Underwriter
416883.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:00 am Reply with quote

Compare this with the British Army's first issue SA-80 L85 IW and L86 LSW which worked well until they got dirty

Did't the 1st M16 get the same faults?

I have got to say the SA-80 is a pig to clean. The gas parts are a nightmare to block with carbon build up.

 
Efros
416933.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:42 am Reply with quote

I seem to remember from some History channel program that the early M16s had serious reliability issues and that a lot of these issues were fixed by chroming the barrel and the chamber.

 
Dr. Know
417222.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:42 am Reply with quote

Grandad tells a story of Sten guns being very unreliable. He once witnessed a man firing his gun, and the ammunition jammed in the barrel. This created a log jam, and the end of the barrel exploded, rather like when someone puts a cork in Elmer fudd's gun.

 
Sadurian Mike
417354.  Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:25 pm Reply with quote

The Sten was designed to be cheap and easy to make, some versions took only five man-hours to complete, and they were pressed and put together at various factories and workshops.

Quality naturally suffered, although it has to be said that most users found the Sten satisfactory. It was a major improvement to an infantry section's short range firepower, and a major achievement for Britain's wartime economy, but the cheap appearance and occaisonal reliability issues did build up a unfortunate reputation.

One QI point about the Sten is that it was used by one of Indira Gandhi's Sikh bodyguards to murder her. He emptied his entire 32-round magazine of 9mm bullets into the then Indian Prime Minister at point-blank range.

 
Dr. Know
417417.  Sat Oct 04, 2008 4:26 am Reply with quote

Grandad says alot of people preferred the German's MP40, which was more reliable than the Sten, and the ammunition was interchangable.

 
Sadurian Mike
417630.  Sat Oct 04, 2008 1:21 pm Reply with quote

There was a lot of grabbing the enemy's weapons during WW2. One reason is that it is easier to respect the firepower of something shooting at you than it is to see the effects of what you are firing.

On the Eastern Front the Russians grabbed the German MP40s and the Germans grabbed the Russian PPSh 41 and 43. Makes you wonder why they didn't just swap weapons at half time.

The MP40 was, however, a decent SMG, albeit one plagued by problems with the magazine feed which had a tendency to jam up, especially in dirty conditions. The weapon is almost synonymous with the WW2 German soldier, even though it was not nearly as common as popular culture would have us believe.

 
Dr. Know
417658.  Sat Oct 04, 2008 2:31 pm Reply with quote

I wonder why the mafia had drum-magazine Thompsons and the army had the other kind.

 

Page 7 of 9
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group