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Flash
3669.  Fri Dec 26, 2003 8:31 pm Reply with quote

Prussian blue was invented by accident in 1704 when one Diesbach was trying to make carmine red but contaminated the mixture with iron and made ferrocyanide.

Cobalt didn't reach Europe till the C19th.

 
Flash
3673.  Sat Dec 27, 2003 10:28 am Reply with quote

The production of woad requires the addition of an alkaline ingredient, and the ingredient of choice for this purpose is the urine of a pre-pubescent boy. In the C18th the main source of urine for the whole of the English dyeing industry was Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and this was one of the town's major exports (the others being coal and beer). Newcastle organised an efficient system whereby people were paid for their urine, which was then distributed around the country by ship.

s: "The History of Woad and the Medieval Woad Vat" by John Edmonds

 
Long Haired Hippy
168663.  Sun Apr 22, 2007 3:11 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Why do we say we're feeling 'blue' if we feel sad? The 'blues' were sad songs originally too.

One explanation I've seen - but with no back-up for it - was that blue is a calming colour to have around, and red is a stimulating colour. Just as seeing red alludes to the strong emotions invoked by the color red, feeling blue or getting the blues represents the extremes of the calm feelings associated with blue.

Anybody else got any idea about this?


I was asked this question yesterday and I had no answer. I was pretty sure it would crop up on this Forum but I'm a little dissapointed that there's not a more full answer here.

According to Wikipedia the phrase is a reference to "having a fit of the blue devils" which is a phrase that can be traced back at least to 1798 in Gearge Colmans farce "Blue Devils, a farce in one act" searching further for "Blue Devils" is hampered somewhat by the frequency of it's use as a sporting nickname for teams and mascots as well as planes and indeed of a blues band.

I'm reminded of the Blue Meanies from Yellow Submarine.

Can anybody else shed some more light?

 
costean
168677.  Sun Apr 22, 2007 4:13 am Reply with quote

The association of the Devil and the colour blue comes from the phrase ‘to burn blue’ in which the weak blue flame of a dying candle was taken as an omen of death or indicating the presence of ghosts or even Old Nick himself (perhaps referring to the blue flame of brimstone).

Quote:
1594 SHAKES. Rich. III, V. iii. 180 The Lights burne blew! It is now dead midnight.
1601 Jul. C. I. iii. 50 The crosse blew Lightning.
1611 BEAUM. & FL. Knt. Burn. Pestle,
Ribands black and candles blue
For him that was of men most true.
1649 BP. REYNOLDS Serm. Hosea i. 54 In a mine, if a damp come, it is in vaine to trust to your lights, they will burn blew, and dimme, and at last vanish.
1726 DE FOE Hist. Devil x, That most wise and solid suggestion, that when the candles burn blue the Devil is in the room.
1824 BYRON Juan XVI. xxvi, His taper Burnt, and not blue, as modest tapers use..Receiving sprites.

S: OED

The first citation of the phrase ‘blue Devil’ dates back to 1616.

Quote:
1616 R. C. Times' Whistle vii. 3443 Alston, whose life hath been accounted evill, And therfore calde by many the blew devill.

ibid

The blue devils (or pink spiders – take your pick) are also a name given to the apparitions (delirium tremens) seen by the inordinately bibulous during the shaky periods (Saturday mornings).

 
iknowbetter
192126.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:24 pm Reply with quote

stephen is wrong in this series with the episode about colours, as there is a welsh for blue and its glas. pronounced glarss.
please check google or any welsh people you know and you'll find this to be true.
As I have checked both and found this to be the case.

 
samivel
192127.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:27 pm Reply with quote

If you check the search engine for this site you will see that this has already been pointed out several times.

 
AlmondFacialBar
192128.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:43 pm Reply with quote

iknowbetter wrote:
stephen is wrong in this series with the episode about colours, as there is a welsh for blue and its glas. pronounced glarss.
please check google or any welsh people you know and you'll find this to be true.
As I have checked both and found this to be the case.


that's weird, though. in breton "glas" means green, like in scots gaelic and irish.

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
samivel
192129.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 5:46 pm Reply with quote

Apparently, it originally covered green in Welsh as well. At least, the Welsh for grass is 'glaswellt', which means 'blue straw'.

 
AlmondFacialBar
192136.  Tue Jul 17, 2007 6:28 pm Reply with quote

would it orginally mean "blue green" ? it's a perfectly good colour after all...

:-)

AlmondFacialBar

 
samivel
192151.  Wed Jul 18, 2007 1:15 am Reply with quote

I think it referred to a range of hues in the grey/green/blue area.

 
Celebaelin
192157.  Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:52 am Reply with quote

As well as being a style of music Bluegrass does also refer to blue grass, particularly that associated with the area around Lexington Kentucky.

http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/bluegrass.html

On the cover of the Lynyrd Skynyrd album Street Survivors the band member Thomas Delmer "Artimus" Pyle (you couldn't make this stuff up) can be seen wearing a T-shirt which reads "MY GRASS IS BLUE". Pyle was born July 15, 1948 in Louisville, Kentucky (belated birthday wishes to you Mr. Pyle sir).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artimus_Pyle

 
dr.bob
192167.  Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:20 am Reply with quote

Kentucky Bluegrass:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_Meadow-grass

Looks green to me.

 
Celebaelin
192169.  Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:31 am Reply with quote

I didn't mean to imply that the grass was blue (it would be something of a rarity to have a blue photosynthetic pigment) I just separated it into blue grass to distinguish it from the Bluegrass music style which in turn gets its name from the rhizoid grass in question. Would it have been less ambiguous to leave it as Bluegrass throughout I wonder? All sorted now anyway.

 
Cruitni
368285.  Wed Jun 25, 2008 1:47 pm Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Kentucky Bluegrass:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smooth_Meadow-grass

Looks green to me.

It only looks blue when it is unmown and has gone to flower and seed, at about a foot and half to 2 feet, then the field is an unmistakable blue. Or if you miss it you have astigmatism or other degenerative or genetic eye disease. Woad is green too.

 
Cruitni
368291.  Wed Jun 25, 2008 1:55 pm Reply with quote

Celebaelin wrote:
As well as being a style of music Bluegrass does also refer to blue grass, particularly that associated with the area around Lexington Kentucky.

http://plantanswers.tamu.edu/turf/publications/bluegrass.html

On the cover of the Lynyrd Skynyrd album Street Survivors the band member Thomas Delmer "Artimus" Pyle (you couldn't make this stuff up) can be seen wearing a T-shirt which reads "MY GRASS IS BLUE". Pyle was born July 15, 1948 in Louisville, Kentucky (belated birthday wishes to you Mr. Pyle sir).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artimus_Pyle


Wishing a happy birthday to a convicted child molester and batterer of girls 4 and 8 when they fail to comply may be misread by some people, as would calling him Sir.

 

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