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Ian Dunn
181854.  Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:40 pm Reply with quote

Aristotle was quite interested in women.

Before Aristotle came along, it was considered by both the Greeks and the Egyptians that it was the father alone who was responsible for the seed from which a child grew, and that the mother was at best responsible for providing it with warmth and nourishment.

Aristotle however said that women had a much bigger role in child development. He said that the woman gets twice the pleasure out of it: "She having an enjoyment both by reception and ejection, by which she is more delighted in."

He also wrote, in a preface about the Organs of Generation in Women:

Aristotle wrote:
"If it were not for th epublic benefit, especially for that professors and practitioners of the art of midwifery, I would refrain from treating the secrets of Nature, because they may be turned to ridicule by lascivious and lewd people. But as it is absolutely necessary that they should be known for the public good I will not omit them because some may mske a wrong use of them."


After this preface, he goes on to talk about, "the pudenda, or things to be ashamed of, because when they are exposed they cause a woman pudor, or shame."

However, not everything he said was right. Aristotle believed that if you wanted a son, the woman should lie on her right-hand side because it contains, "the greatest generative heat, which is the chief procuring cause of male children."

Some people believe that Aristotle may have been somewhat sexist.

Wikipedia wrote:
His analysis of procreation is frequently criticized on the grounds that it presupposes an active, ensouling masculine element bringing life to an inert, passive, lumpen female element; it is on these grounds that some feminist critics refer to Aristotle as a misogynist.


Source: Mr. Hartson's Most Excellent Encylopedia of Useless Information: The Supreme Miscellany of Fantastic Facts by William Hartson.

Wikipedia article on Aristotle

 
jblackley
181859.  Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:53 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
After this preface, he goes on to talk about, "the pudenda, or things to be ashamed of, because when they are exposed they cause a woman pudor, or shame."

However, not everything he said was right.


Bit of an unfortunate collision of ideas there, eh?

 
djgordy
181860.  Mon Jun 11, 2007 2:54 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
Aristotle was quite interested in women.


I always thought that Aristotle and I had something in common.

I expect that. should the topic of females crop up, Mr. Fry will make one of his "not exactly my area of expertise" comments.

 
Maud
182218.  Tue Jun 12, 2007 5:39 pm Reply with quote

My English teacher made one of those comments today, I rather love him for it.

 
dr.bob
182295.  Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:28 am Reply with quote

Perhaps the F series should have a "Female" or "Feminine" episode with an all female panel

(except for Alan, obviously, though he should probably wear a dress or something)

 
Ameena
182304.  Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:14 am Reply with quote

Yeah, and a girly wig...




Ooh, now I'm thinking red-and-white dress, blonde wig with plaits, penguin glove puppets... ;)

 
Tas
182307.  Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:20 am Reply with quote

Alan's curly mop is not gurly enough????

LOL

:-)

Tas

 
Ian Dunn
182342.  Wed Jun 13, 2007 7:38 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Perhaps the F series should have a "Female" or "Feminine" episode with an all female panel

(except for Alan, obviously, though he should probably wear a dress or something)


I would love that! It is about time there was an all-woman episode on the show. We need to get more women on it.

 
Norfolkian
182488.  Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:21 pm Reply with quote

Ian Dunn wrote:
dr.bob wrote:
Perhaps the F series should have a "Female" or "Feminine" episode with an all female panel

(except for Alan, obviously, though he should probably wear a dress or something)


I would love that! It is about time there was an all-woman episode on the show. We need to get more women on it.


Agreed. I would volunteer but don't think I'm famous enough. Or indeed at all. I'd be a female version of Alan - just like him, but with bigger breasts.

 
Ian Dunn
189726.  Tue Jul 10, 2007 3:16 am Reply with quote

Here is something quite interesting. Wisdom is female, or at least it is according to the Bible.


Proverbs 1:20-22 wrote:
Wisdom shouts in the streets. She cries out in the public square. She calls out to the crowds along the main street, and those in front of city hall. "You simpletons!" she cries. "How long will ou go on being simpleminded? How long will you mockers relish your mocking? How long will you fools fight the facts?

 
Beep
189751.  Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:05 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Wisdom is female, or at least it is according to the Bible.


Probably all down to the translation; from my admittedly extremely-limited exposure to that document, it's not exactly female-friendly.

 
Jenny
190133.  Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:26 am Reply with quote

Straining my brain (for I have little-to-no Greek) doesn't Sophia mean 'wisdom' and wouldn't that have been the word used in the Greek version of the Bible from which that would have been translated?

 
suze
190220.  Wed Jul 11, 2007 10:51 am Reply with quote

Yes, and yes.

Woodhouse's English-Greek Dictionary gives σοφία for "wisdom". And the capital of Bulgaria is named after a church dedicated to holy wisdom (Agia Sofia).

 
Tas
190223.  Wed Jul 11, 2007 11:04 am Reply with quote

So, Sophia is 'wisdom'. Where does sophistry come from?

:-)

Tas

 
markvent
190239.  Wed Jul 11, 2007 11:30 am Reply with quote

Tas wrote:
So, Sophia is 'wisdom'. Where does sophistry come from?

:-)

Tas


Wiki : Sophism

but is Sophisticated related ?

Mark.

[edit: Yes it is - it means having gathered wisdom]

 

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