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eggshaped
324502.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:13 am Reply with quote

Some RPS players claim to be in "the zone" and can predict their opponents next few moves.

s: wrp

 
Flash
324510.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:33 am Reply with quote

Quote:
ChessandPoker.com Initial Throw Prediction Chart

Rock-Lead: Full-aggression throw. The hard, weapon-like character of Rock can make it a subconscious choice when wanting to crush the opponent. It may also be chosen when the player feels backed against the wall or otherwise in imminent danger of losing. This is a fighting-back throw that tries to demonstrate brute force over tactical choices.

Paper-Lead: Low-aggression throw. Paper is a subtle throw that can turn an opponents aggression against them. However, it is the least attacking throw to the human mind, which sometimes may judge it to be a weak defensive maneuver. This view can cause it to be discarded if facing defeat or when the player feels a need to counter-attack more decisively.

Scissors-Lead: Half-aggression throw. The sleek and cutting nature of the Scissors throw utilizes a refined aggression. In comparison to the heavy-handed force of the Rock, this throw may be subconsciously viewed as a subtle finesse which is still aggressive but somewhat tempered by modern tact. A surgical strike that can accent an existing lead.

http://www.chessandpoker.com/rps_rock_paper_scissors_strategy.html

 
Flash
324512.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:36 am Reply with quote

This is nice:
Quote:
This is a con I read about twenty-five years ago in Chuck Wielgus and Alexander Wolff's The In-Your-Face Basketball Book, but it continues to work with unprecedented success: The next time you have to settle a minor dispute, challenge your adversary to a game of rock-paper-scissors. Count to three and pick whatever option you want, but make sure your throw is extremely (and obviously) late. Your opponent will accuse you of cheating, and you will say, "Sorry, my fault. Let's do it again." Make note of whatever choice your opponent made; in all likelihood, he will attempt the same throw again. When faced with this situation, players inevitably try to use reverse psychology. They will almost always replicate their previous throw, based on the assumption that you will be expecting something different. But you are not. Victory is yours.

http://www.esquire.com/dont-miss/useful-part/useful-rockpaper0607

 
Flash
324514.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:42 am Reply with quote

Report from Nov 2006
Quote:
If you thought "rock, paper, scissors" was a game for kids, think again. The world championships were held last weekend in Toronto and were won by a Briton... Bob Cooper, 28 ...

So how did he achieve it, last week in Toronto, defeating a field of more than 500 contestants and an American in the final?

"Hard work, training and lots of research into tactics, body language and basic psychology," he says.

His sunglasses helped him to the top prize, he believes.

"It's similar to poker when you're out there bluffing, putting out the right or wrong signals. The eyes give away a lot so the shades are a definite benefit."

Bluffing is called "priming" and enables a player to either fake a move or provoke the opponent into a wrong move, he says.

Cooper spent one or two hours each day training for the event, playing friends and colleagues or studying tactics.

"Hopefully I could get nominated for Sports Personality of the Year, or we could begin a campaign to reopen nominations," says Cooper.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6159658.stm

 
WB
324521.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:51 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:
Whilst some games, such as the ones mentioned by WB and Flash, can be analysed by game theory to provide the best strategy, I can't see that applying to RPS in any way.


I would have said that RPS is a perfectly good candidate for analysis by game theory. It is a finite, symmetric game and so the optimal strategy for each player is the same and the value of the game (the average return using the optimal strategy) is 0. But this doesn't stop there being an optimal strategy (in this case playing each item randomly one third of the time). A strategy of say always playing ROCK would not be very sensible.

 
eggshaped
324523.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:54 am Reply with quote

The "how to win" article that Moll posted has this:

Quote:
Haven't a clue what to throw next? Then go with Paper. Why? Statistically, in competition play, it has been observed that scissors is thrown the least often. Specifically, it gets delivered 29.6% of the time, so it slightly under-indexes against the expected average of 33.33% by 3.73%. Obviously, knowing this only gives you a slight advantage, but in a situation where you just don't know what to do, even a slight edge is better than none at all.


s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324526.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 8:57 am Reply with quote

According to official rules:

Quote:
All temporary amendments are considered ephemeral unless otherwise agreed upon, but must not include any variant throws beyond the basic trinity such as, but not limited to, dynamite, bird, well, spock, god, water, lightning, bomb, matchstick, water, and/or Texas longhorn.


s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324528.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:00 am Reply with quote

When choosing Rock:

Quote:
The thumb must not be concealed by the fingers


s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324530.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:01 am Reply with quote

Quote:
Use of the "vertical paper" (sometimes referred to as "the handshake") is considered exceptionally bad form.


Quote:
Make sure any onlookers are aware of the intentions of the players as the swinging of closed fists can be mistaken as a sign of a potentially combative situation.


Don't expect your opponent to offer a handshake at the end of a game. This is:

Quote:
due to the fact that in general a "Handshake" is used as "deal sealer" between two parties. Since the results of an RPS match are considered to be binding, the "handshake" can be considered a redundancy since, in effect, the " deal" has already been "sealed" with the outcome of the match.


s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324535.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:08 am Reply with quote

According to an article in "Think Three", the RPS periodical:

Quote:
One of the few references [from Greece] that has surfaced refers to a man in a tavern who had “the ability to predict his rival’s next choice in the game of hands and thus grew rich.”


Don't suppose that sounds familiar to you, 96aelw?

 
eggshaped
324547.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:21 am Reply with quote

According to this article, if your opponent plays scissors first, you can predict the type of player he is by the angle of his scissors. For instance, if he does a wide scissor then he is aggressive and may throw lots of future rocks, but if it is a thin scissor, he is experienced and you can expect lots of deceptive throws.

s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324550.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:28 am Reply with quote

A "gambit" is a series of three moves that are part of a pre-ordained strategy.

Gambits include:

Avalanche: RRR
Beurocrat: PPP
Toolbox: SSS
Crescendo: PSR
Fistful o Dollars: RPP

s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324554.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:34 am Reply with quote

Will mentioned in an e-mail that in an ideal world there can be no strategy in RPS, as if the choice is random, there is no statistical advantage of any throw.

Some people advocate "chaos play" which supposedly is this very thing; playing completely random throws. However critics claim there is "no such thing as a random throw. Human beings will always use some impulse or inclination to choose a throw, and will therefore settle into unconscious but nonetheless predicable patterns".

s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324557.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:37 am Reply with quote

One trendy RPS strategy is an "Exclusion Strategy" where one deliberately never uses one of the three throws. For instance, if you completely ignore "rock", then chances are, your opponent will become obsessed with when the rock will finally "drop".

s: wrp

 
eggshaped
324569.  Fri Apr 25, 2008 9:52 am Reply with quote

It seems that New Scientist has covered some of the above:

Quote:
According to New Scientist magazine, you should always start with scissors. Research has shown that stone, also called rock, is the most popular of the three possible moves in the game.

This means that your opponent is most likely to choose paper, because he or she will expect to you to start the game with stone. By going with scissors, you will outwit them


The Daily Telegraph (London); Dec 20, 2007

However, now that this was in all the papers, surely the best thing to play is Rock.

 

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