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Vampire legends

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maiden
306972.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:43 pm Reply with quote

Mrs Elizabeth Caroline Grey (1798 - 1869)

Wrote 'The Skeleton Count (or The Vampire Mistress)', a tale of the undead, in the autumn of 1828, for The Casket, a weekly penny paper. Although the word Vampire only features in the sub-heading of this serial, the magazine gave it front page mentions to epics such as The Vampires of London and Der Vampyr

The story of The Skeleton Count concerns Count Rudolph of Ravensburg who has made a pact with the Devil in return for eternal life. However, the condition of this agreement is that each night he is transformed into a fleshless skeleton, with the transformation taking place precisely at sunset until sunrise, when the count resumes his natural shape.

Other titles by Grey. E, include;

The Ordeal by Touch (1846)
The Iron Mask (1847)
The Horrors of Zindorf Castle (1850)
Murder Will Out (1860)

:)

 
Sadurian Mike
306975.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:45 pm Reply with quote

A skeletal vampire?

Some physical issues there, surely, lol. (Animated skeletons and undead being perferctly normal, of course).

 
maiden
307002.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:00 pm Reply with quote

Varney the Vampyre (or The Feast of Blood)

Was first published in 1847, with the saga first issued in penny parts and became so popular with readers that the author, kept it going for a total of 109 issues before Varney finally met his fate by leaping into the lava pit at Mount Vesuvius.

There is some debate as to who the author of 'Varney' was and it was originally thought to be Thomas Peckett Prest, but subsequent research has suggested the real author was James Malcolm Rymer (1814 - 1881)

Varney the Vampyre begins during the time of Oliver Cromwell and in the ensuring years, the corpse-like man attacks dozens of victims, both men and women, unitl he finally takes his own life.

It has been suggested Varney the Vampyre is based on Richard Verney, a blood-thirsty follower of King Charles and a rabid opponent of the Protector

:)

 
Sadurian Mike
307009.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:06 pm Reply with quote

maiden wrote:
Varney the Vampyre (or The Feast of Blood)

The name never struck me as one to inspire fear. "Varney the Vampire" sounds a little too much like a kids' cartoon, which I suppose it was in one way.

 
maiden
307010.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:06 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
A skeletal vampire?

Some physical issues there, surely, lol. (Animated skeletons and undead being perferctly normal, of course).


Yep, apparently so ... a skeletal vampire

I have read one of the preserved extracts of The Skeleton Count (because most has been lost, due to it only being published in The Casket and not in an actual book) and it's actually very good ... a real Gothic classic

Yes, I know skeletal vampires just don't seem right against animated skeletons and the undead ... cause they are just so normal and everyday, aren't they? !!!!! LOL

:)

 
maiden
307015.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:09 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
maiden wrote:
Varney the Vampyre (or The Feast of Blood)

The name never struck me as one to inspire fear. "Varney the Vampire" sounds a little too much like a kids' cartoon, which I suppose it was in one way.


Yes, those little 'penny' magazines were a little cartoonish in a way and I suppose that's why they deserved the name of 'Penny Dreadfuls', which is what they were normally called.

lol

:)

 
maiden
307020.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:17 pm Reply with quote

Alexandre Dumas (1802 - 1870)

The Pale Lady (1849), is narrated by the woman of the title, to the other members of a group, explaining how she was attacked by a vampire in the dark recesses of the Carpathians.

Of course Dumas is better known for
The Three Musketeers
The Corsican Brothers
The Count of Monte Cristo

:)

 
maiden
307025.  Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:24 pm Reply with quote

Julian Hawthorne (1846 - 1934)

The Grave of Ethelind Fionguala is the story of an American artist travelling in Ireland, who becomes fasinated by a sixteenth-century legend about a beautiful bride captured by a band of vampires and who is now said to haunt the scene of the crime.

:)

 
bobwilson
307750.  Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:12 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
bobwilson wrote:
Whether Vampirism (ie Dracula) actually exists is not the issue - what matters is the perception of whether Dracula exists.

I'm not disagreeing with the essence of your post but....

Vampire does not equal Dracula in the same way as Pirate does not equal Long John Silver. They are both merely famous representations of their respective group.


Point taken - I was using a lazy shorthand - what I meant was Vampirism as understood in a Dracula-type mythology as disctinct from the real phenomenon of blood-drinking.

 
maiden
310172.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 6:04 pm Reply with quote

Mary Cholmondeley (1859 - 1925)

Let Loose (1890)
Red Pottage (1899)
Moth and Rust (1902)
Prisoners (1906)
The Lowest Rung (1908)
Under One Roof (1918)

Let Loose was an important step in the development of the Vampire genre, being the earliest short story of the 'possession of the dead'

:)

 
maiden
310182.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 6:24 pm Reply with quote

A True Story of a Vampire - Count Eric Stenbock

This curious story by an even more curious author was published three years before Dracula appeared and at the time when Bram Stoker would have been busy writing his tale of the vampire count. While Stoker may not have read the story of a 'serpent vampire', Count Stenbock himself was at the time one of the most talked about and controversial figures in London and Stoker would have undoubtedly have known about him.

Stenbock has been described as a person whose life was more fantasy than reality; a man with a waxen complexion and lank, flowing hair, who dressed almost exclusively in evening dress with a flowing cloak. He was said to receive guests in his London flat while sitting in a coffin (something Bela Lugosi also decided to do in his latter years), and had an obsession with weird creatures - keeping a toad as a 'familiar' which sat on his shoulder as he ate and a snake which coiled around his feet. There were even rumours that he practised black magic.

He cultivated the strangest of lifestyles, enjoying anything to do with death and decay. He rarely went out by day and lit his home only with black candles. He was a drug user and heavy drinker, which contributed to his early death, but not before he had founded the 'Idiots Club'.

Other works by Stenbock include:
A Dream
The Lunatic Lover


:)

 
maiden
310735.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:50 pm Reply with quote

Grettir of Thorhall-Stead by Benjamin Franklin Norris (1870 – 1902)

Frank Norris is widely regarded as one of America’s 19th century literary giants, as well as being the country’s first important writer of naturalistic novels. Less well known – he was also the man who introduced to vampire fiction the concept of the ‘animated dead’ – the undead revived by another will.

Grettir of Thorhall-Stead is set in the ice-bound, hostile wastes of Iceland and there is something very similar about the ‘entity’ that comes out of the snows to the one that appears in the final confrontation between Frankenstein and his creature in the Arctic.

Other works include:

Vandover and the Brute (1894)
McTeague (1899) … a novel about alcoholism and murder
The Octopus (1901) … The opening up of the American West by the railways

:)

 
maiden
310736.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:55 pm Reply with quote

Vikram the Vampire (pub. 1893) by Sir Richard Burton (1821 - 1890), famous explorer

He translated and printed the Kama Sutra (1883) and The Perfumed Garden (1886) and published a complete edition of the Arabian Nights (1885 - 88)

 
maiden
310778.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:38 pm Reply with quote

Here are some reference books regarding the folklore of vampirism

Paul Barber, Vampires, Burial and Death, (1988)

Michael E Bell, Food for the Dead: On the Trail of New England’s Vampires, (2001)

Basil Cooper, The Vampire in Legend and Fact, (1974)

Alan Dundes (ed.) The Vampire: A Casebook, (1998)

Jan L Perkowski, The Darkling: A Treatise on Slavic Vampirism, (1989)

Jan L Perkowski, Vampires of the Slavs, (1976)

:)

 
maiden
310780.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 4:46 pm Reply with quote

Laws of Vampirism

1. DISCRETION

2. DIVERSITY

3. SAFETY

4. CONTROL

5. LIFESTYLE

6. FAMILY

7. HAVENS

8. TERRITORY

9. RESPONSIBILITY

10. ELDERS

11. DONORS

12. LEADERSHIP

13. IDEALS

This is a widely accepted code of ethics pioneered by The Black Veil. (If you want to know which each rule means in full, I'm sure I have the explanations somewhere - I'll dig them out)

:)

 

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