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Flash
310737.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:58 pm Reply with quote

You could have said that she was based on a real liaison of Dumas' called Marie Duplessis:
Quote:
The young Dumas, while growing, somewhat dissolute, was one of the many lovers of the fascinating courtesan who was Paris' arbiter of elegance, perennial in the gazettes, carrying camellias, always. An exquisitely enchanting maiden, who rented her love, thus making and spending millions. Duplessis was notorious for her extravagance, and, conveniently, the spell she cast on rich men. She was a fixture at theaters and gaming houses. A madly desired Marie Duplessis could never have imagined she would one day be the muse of Sarah Bernhardt Pola Negri, Eleonora Duse and Greta Garbo. 'La dame aux camellias" the novel and play both became success-de-scandale, both finding an instant and feverish acclaim. This old Romantic novel is based on the true story of Alphonsine Plessis, an abnormally pretty farmer, who abused by her brutal father, runs off to Paris and becomes a grisette. It's believed Plessis began selling his daughter at the age of twelve. There, in Paris, quite effortlessly, she becomes a ravishing courtesan, a swan, before dying of consumption at the age of 23.

and that, after she dumped Dumas, she copped off with Franz Liszt.

I like the expression "rented her love".

 
Jenny
310758.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 3:08 pm Reply with quote

Flash - they wouldn't have used the word tuberculosis, but the word 'consumption' does crop up in that text. Towards the end we find:

Quote:
To-day I am ill; I may die of this illness, for I have always had
the presentiment that I shall die young. My mother died of
consumption, and the way I have always lived could but increase
the only heritage she ever left me.

 
Flash
310793.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Of course. Well spotted.

<coughs discreetly into handkerchief>

 
96aelw
310826.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:01 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
after she dumped Dumas, she copped off with Franz Liszt.


While Liszt's amorous career has had a mention, I may as well lodge the nugget that the great man is said (I can't yet find a source that's willing to nail its colours to the mast on this one; they all hide behind the same caveat as me, thus far) to have ended his affair with Lola Montez by creeping out of the hotel room while she was asleep, locking the door, and running, so to speak, for the hills. I shall try to get this properly sorted out later, but if I don't stick it down here now, I shall forget to.

 
Flash
310831.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:33 pm Reply with quote

Yes, that one is firmly in the "allegedly" camp. This from an article I wrote for the Idler magazine some time ago:

Quote:
Returning to Berlin she attended a concert given by the wildly popular Franz Liszt and immediately succeeded in attaching herself to him; she was apparently irritated that in his company she was no longer the centre of attention, but she enjoyed meeting Wagner. After a time, though, she caused a brawl at a dinner party held in Liszt’s honour and he abandoned her, allegedly locking her into their hotel room and paying the manager not to open the door for twelve hours, by which time he was well clear of the city.


Bruce Seymour's biography describes the last bit as "a story which first appeared in print in the twentieth century" but he goes on to say that the rumour may have been current at the time, because Lola refers in her memoirs to an unflattering account of her parting from Liszt.

The endnotes say:
Quote:
For a discussion of this story, see Walker, Franz Liszt 1:393 and fn 28; MEM 2:180

MEM being Lola's memoirs (in German).

Lola also had something going on with Dumas pere, as it happens, and at least met Dumas fils as all three of them were witnesses at the trial in 1846 of the man who killed Lola's lover Dujarier in a duel.

 
MatC
310888.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 4:29 am Reply with quote

WB wrote:
I think if John Sessions was on the show, he would also know that Camille (& Violetta) died of consumption (i.e. TB or Tuberculosis) not emphysema. Although there are now drug resistant strains, TB is treatable with antibiotics. Emphysema is not and the lung damage is irreversible. The coughing with TB usually brings up blood.


As I understand it - from my lofty position of never having read, seen or heard any version of this masterwork - the illness is not specified; it was understood (ie, interpreted) at the time that she had emphysema; I would be willing to make a blind bet that future generations had her, in modern dress versions, dying of, say, TB or AIDS, as befitted the fashion of the moment.

 
MatC
310890.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 4:34 am Reply with quote

Could all this link with the Fainting/corsets stuff elsewhere, as a sort of general “19th century ladies in distress” strand?

 
Flash
310897.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 4:47 am Reply with quote

Yes, perhaps.

 
WB
310937.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:17 am Reply with quote

MatC wrote:
As I understand it - from my lofty position of never having read, seen or heard any version of this masterwork - the illness is not specified; it was understood (ie, interpreted) at the time that she had emphysema; I would be willing to make a blind bet that future generations had her, in modern dress versions, dying of, say, TB or AIDS, as befitted the fashion of the moment.


In my other life as a stage designer I have worked on La Traviata several times. In Act III where Violetta is dying the Doctor confides to the maid: La tisi non le accorda che poche ore. My translation of the libretto here gives "She's dying of consumption, her life is over."
La tisi is old italian for consumption. See http://www.antiquusmorbus.com/International/Italian.htm

Piave, who wrote the libretto, based the dialogue quite closely on the play.

 
MatC
310959.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:48 am Reply with quote

That's interesting, WB - he based it on the play, rather than the novel?

 
Molly Cule
317487.  Wed Apr 16, 2008 6:50 am Reply with quote

The Tree Man . I can't actually read this right now... http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/04/16/wtree116.xml

 
eggshaped
317697.  Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:42 am Reply with quote

Way back when, there was an "oldest organism" discussion on this thread. Just wanted to draw whomever it may concern to a new claim for the oldest tree.

An 8000 year old root system of Spruce trees in Sweden.

Quote:
Kullman explained that, while any individual tree growing in the area would itself not be more than a few hundred years old, any tree found on site over the centuries would be generated from the same genetic root system.

“There is constant turnover in what is actually growing above ground,” he said.

“But genetically, the trees growing today are the same as those from thousands of years ago.”


http://www.thelocal.se/11054/20080411/

 
WB
317777.  Wed Apr 16, 2008 12:12 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Way back when, there was an "oldest organism" discussion on this thread. Just wanted to draw whomever it may concern to a new claim for the oldest tree.

An 8000 year old root system of Spruce trees in Sweden.


Yes I spotted this, but I don't think it really stands up. The trees in Methuselah's walk are 4,600 years old. These Swedish trees are not themselves 8,000 years old, they are like the clonal colony of Aspens - and that is of the order of 80,000 years old!

post 293395

 
eggshaped
326897.  Tue Apr 29, 2008 4:08 am Reply with quote

I don't know if this is a bit late for the flora show, but it turns out that some wasps have sex with orchids.

They find the orchids so irrisistible that they actually ejaculate; the advantage to the orchid is obvious, it means that more of its pollen is distributed, but it's more of a non-negative for the wasp. You would normally think that wasps wasting valuable sperm would be less evolutionarily viable, but it turns out that it may happen because in this species the females can reproduce without help from males.

http://www.livescience.com/strangenews/080428-orchid-climax.html

Link to FETISH, FEMINISM.

 
eggshaped
350313.  Mon Jun 02, 2008 4:32 am Reply with quote

Posted here for future use: at least to go into SQUIRE:

The bananas that we eat today are smaller, less tasty and less hardy than the ones your grandparents ate.

This was down to Panama disease (or Fusarum Wilt) which hit the crop in the 1960s. The old banana was called the Gros Michel and it was made virtually extinct by the blight; the current is called the cavendish.

http://www.the-scientist.com/news/display/54710/

 

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