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Funerals

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Jenny
312588.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:31 am Reply with quote

The Chinese wear white for mourning as well don't they?

 
eggshaped
312601.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:49 am Reply with quote

This reminds me of the origins of the "little black dress". John Singer Sargent caused uproar with his painting of an alluring woman (Madame X) in a black dress. I think it was because this colour was generally thought of as a mourning colour, and so a grief-stricken woman should not be wearing such a provocative dress. But then that doesn't really make sense if white was the French colour of mourning.



link

 
MatC
318340.  Thu Apr 17, 2008 6:09 am Reply with quote

Vaguely related to funerals ...

In 1945, London was faced with a gigantic homelessness crisis. Temporary homes - huts and prefabs - were erected by councils in all sorts of places, including, in Shoreditch, on a disused burial ground.

Quote:
Here, the wife of a young soldier and their children who had lost their home to a V-1 were to have a distinctive address: 1 The Graveyard, Shoreditch. Her hutment home would be built over old graves and her view would be of tombstones.


Sixteen hutments were built there, on “London’s first graveyard estate.” Permission to build on consecrated ground was given by the Bishop of London.

S: ‘London 1945’ by Maureen Waller (John Murray, 2005).

 
eggshaped
333198.  Fri May 09, 2008 6:43 am Reply with quote

Another "Green" burial: dissolve the body in Lye and flush it down the drain:

Quote:
The process is called alkaline hydrolysis and was developed in the United States 16 years ago to get rid of animal carcasses. It uses lye, 300-degree (150 degree Celsius) heat and 60 pounds of pressure per square inch to destroy bodies in big stainless-steel cylinders that are similar to pressure cookers.


Quote:
"We believe this process, which enables a portion of human remains to be flushed down a drain, to be undignified," said Patrick McGee, a spokesman for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Manchester (NH).


http://www.livescience.com/strangenews/080508-ap-lye-funeral.html

 
eggshaped
351239.  Tue Jun 03, 2008 2:51 am Reply with quote

The guy who invented the pringles can (Dr. Fredric J. Baur) has had some of his remains buried in a pringles can.

link

 

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