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Funerals

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Molly Cule
292170.  Fri Mar 07, 2008 1:13 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
The Mayor of a village in south-west France has threatened residents with severe punishment if they die, because there is no room left in the overcrowded cemetery to bury them.

In an ordinance posted in the council offices, Mayor Gerard Lalanne told the 260 residents of the village of Sarpourenx that "all persons not having a plot in the cemetery and wishing to be buried in Sarpourenx are forbidden from dying in the parish".

It added: "Offenders will be severely punished".

The Mayor said he was forced to take drastic action after an administrative court in the nearby town of Pau ruled in January that the acquisition of adjoining private land to extend the cemetery would not be justified.

Mr Lalanne, who celebrated his 70th birthday on Wednesday and is standing for election to a seventh term in this month's local elections, said he was sorry that there had not been a positive outcome to the dilemma.

"It may be a laughing matter for some, but not for me," he said.


http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/03/06/2181533.htm

 
Flash
292189.  Fri Mar 07, 2008 2:24 pm Reply with quote

A friend of mine made a film called Roseanna's Grave based on this premise: a man's wife is terminally ill and wants to be buried in the village graveyard, but it's nearly full - so he has to devote all his energies to keeping everybody in the village alive so they don't pre-decease his wife and use up a grave.

Having said that, I don't believe the story as reported. It's just too bonkers to be true, isn't it?

 
Molly Cule
296014.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 9:19 am Reply with quote

At the most important monastery in Russia, Ivolginsky Datsan, located in East Siberia near Lake Baikal, you can see the preserved body of the Khambo Lama, who died in 1927. He knew he was going to die so asked his fellow monks to meditate with him and begin funeral rites. He died in the lotus position and has stayed like that ever since. He was buried upright in a wooden box. The body has been dug up a few times and is still in good condition. In 2002 he was unveiled and although there has been some decay the body is still well preserved. Pilgrims from around Russia come to touch their heads to his scarf, which sticks out of the wooden box.

http://www.sacred-destinations.com/russia/ivolginsky-datsan-buddhist-temple.htm

 
MatC
296035.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 9:52 am Reply with quote

That's interesting, Molly; I've got a small file on people supposed to have been buried upright, including Clemenceau.

 
WB
296078.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 10:55 am Reply with quote

I'm following up a thread on 'Freezing' where a Swedish lady, Susanne Wiigh-Maesak, is trying to license a method of corpse disposal by 'freeze-drying' (sic). Her process seems to be: dip the body in liquid nitrogen, shake it till it shatters, run a magnet over it to pick up metal bits and then bury the powder in an eco friendly box made of potato starch (not really sure where the drying part comes in). The place is called Jonkoping (umlauts on both o's). I can't find any reference to it actually happening yet. Last ref I can find is Jul 10 2007 in the Times, where they say the whole thing is still bound up in bureaucratic red tape. Lots of references to other councils being interested in UK.

 
Frederick The Monk
296089.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:07 am Reply with quote

Wouldn't it be easier to just cremate bodies in terms of the energy used liquifying and storing the nitrogen - or is that less than the furnace option?

 
eggshaped
296092.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:07 am Reply with quote

I guess you could try getting in touch with Wiigh-Maesak's company.

http://www.promessa.se/contact_en.asp

 
WB
296107.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:18 am Reply with quote

I think that the original incentive was to avoid paying a huge bill for the conversion of the town's existing crematorium which needed to meet new EC emission standards. I've read it has to do with Mercury vapour from old burning dental fillings causing pollution........

 
Frederick The Monk
296117.  Fri Mar 14, 2008 11:25 am Reply with quote

That makes sense. It's certainly less immediately polluting, although I assume the fillings go into the box with the dust and get buried as they're not going to be picked up by a magnet.

 
eggshaped
308144.  Tue Apr 01, 2008 7:09 am Reply with quote

A sin-eater was one who was paid by the relatives of a deceased, but sinful, person who had not been able to recant the errors of his ways. The sin-eater would supposedly purify the dead-man's soul by eating a meal of bread and ale that had been prepared on the body.

s: OED

 
Jenny
308288.  Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:46 am Reply with quote

According to a blog from a retired funeral director,

Quote:
Black mourning dress became popular during Queen Victoriaís reign. After Prince Albert died she never wore anything else, and the fashion persisted until the late 20th century. Most people donít know why they wear black, if they do, or why they should. It began in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, when death rituals demonstrated worth and social status.


However, death rituals certainly demonstrated worth and social status before that - Pepys' Diary records him being given gifts of mourning rings at funerals.

 
MatC
312383.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 5:01 am Reply with quote

We discussed, but did we ever use, the Gen Ig about WC Fields's tombstone?

 
Flash
312399.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 5:26 am Reply with quote

Don't think so.

 
Frederick The Monk
312400.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 5:26 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
Black mourning dress became popular during Queen Victoriaís reign. After Prince Albert died she never wore anything else, and the fashion persisted until the late 20th century. Most people donít know why they wear black, if they do, or why they should. It began in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, when death rituals demonstrated worth and social status.


The French mourning colour was white. Here's Mary Queen of Scots in mourning for her late husband Francois I, after an original by Francois Clouet (1561)

 
MatC
312444.  Tue Apr 08, 2008 6:30 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Don't think so.


Might as well post it up then:

<<<MYTHCONCEPTIONS: 125: WC FIELDS'S TOMBSTONE

by Mat Coward.

THE MYTH: "On the whole, I'd sooner be in [or playing] Philadelphia" - it's perhaps the most famous bequeathed giggle of all time; the monumental engraving which marks the final rotting place of a comic actor who is remembered and revered as much for his misanthropy as for the films he appeared in.

THE "TRUTH": It hurts me to type these words, but - folks, there is no such tombstone message. There isn't even a tombstone. WC was cremated, and the plaque upon his reliquary carries only the simple, restrained, and hideously disappointing words: "WC Fields 1880-1946".

SOURCES: An item in The Independent (30 January 1999), concerning a new biography: "Man on the flying trapeze: The life and times of WC Fields," by Simon Louvish, published by Faber & Faber.

DISCLAIMER: What a revoltin' development! Can anyone say it ain't so? Mythcon Control would be unusually pleased to hear from you, if you can disprove this po-faced revisionism.

>>>

 

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