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eggshaped
310508.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:17 am Reply with quote

Egyptian ceremonial fans were often phallic in shape (that is, the middle feather was longer than other feathers). This is because they were used to celebrate Osiris, who, when killed by his brother Typhon, was cut into pieces. These pieces were found by Isis, but she couldn't find his genitals, so they became the most venerated part of him; associated with many special rites.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310511.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:19 am Reply with quote

Around the time of Louis XIV, giant fans were available that were suspended from the ceiling and worked by four servants.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310516.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:21 am Reply with quote

A fan from the 1780s commemorated Jean Pierre Blanchard's first ever descent from a hot-air balloon by parachute. Writing on the fan claimed that in the future all the world would travel by air instead of by coach.

Link to FUTURE

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310518.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:22 am Reply with quote

In the 18th century, spanish soldiers would carry fans.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310520.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:24 am Reply with quote

In the same century, the fan industry in England was helped by the country having a large number of "skilled craftsmen who specialised in the making of sticks".

Making? of Sticks?

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310525.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:29 am Reply with quote

The company to first publish the "language of the fan" was called Fanella.

 
eggshaped
310528.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:32 am Reply with quote

There was another way of communicating by fan, as expressed in The Gentleman's Magazine in 1740.

Quote:
Five signals are given, corresponding to the five divisions of the alphabet, the different letters, omitting the J being capable of division into five, the movements 1,2,3,4,5 corresponding to each letter in each division.

By moving the fan with the left hand to right arm.
The same movement but with right hand to left arm.
Placing against the bosom.
Raising it to the mouth.
To the forehead.


s: CGF
http://pagesperso-orange.fr/eventail/gal3.htm

According to that site:

Quote:
Nancy Armstrong, in her book Fans refers to some 18th century fans that were made in such a way that one could hold up the fan and pull back a tiny section revealing a letter of the alphabet behind it -- spelling out each word rather than remembering each fan 'signal'. Rather slow, and of course requiring good eyesight!

 
eggshaped
310530.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:34 am Reply with quote

According to Chamber's Encyclopedia, at certain dances, the car-keys - sorry, I mean fans - of the ladies present were put in a hat. The men would pull out a fan to chose their dancing partner. Apparantly, a lady became "known" in society by which fan she carried.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
310531.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:37 am Reply with quote

Putting your thumb to your nose and wiggling your fingers in an insulting manner was once known as a "Queen Anne's Fan".

s: CGF

 
Flash
310602.  Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:11 am Reply with quote

Top stuff

 
MatC
311853.  Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:26 am Reply with quote

Have we done the language of flowers before?

 
MatC
311876.  Mon Apr 07, 2008 8:03 am Reply with quote

It’s rather scattered across the threads, but this could be a note to go with fan language, flower language, smoke signals etc ...


Quote:
Pots also had a curious signalling function. A form of semaphore began in about 300 BC when the Greeks devised a means of arranging large vases on two low walls to spell out different letters of the alphabet.


Flowerpots were apparently invented by Rameses III, in about 1230 BC. Finding his country’s great gardening tradition too formal, he created 514 “semi-public” gardens which he “fitted out with informal flowerpots.”

Flowerpots next appear in ancient Greece. For the great summer festival of Adonis, women used them to grow seedlings which would then be allowed to wither to symbolise Adonis’s early death.

S: ‘Gardeners, gurus & grubs’ by George Drower (Sutton, 2001)

 
eggshaped
371363.  Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:23 am Reply with quote

This is a bit late for the F series, but perhaps we can use it in the F-series when the show is sold to South Korea... hmmm

Anyway, it seems to be a widespread opinion in that country that if you leave a fan running in a closed room you may die. It has been reported by government agencies and is a regular news item in Korean media.

more from wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan_death

 
Jenny
371415.  Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:15 am Reply with quote

Egg - I wonder if we could do an updated 'language of fans' for the annual. Something like 'the language of mobile phones' maybe?

 
eggshaped
371431.  Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:30 am Reply with quote

That's a brilliant idea... Let's continue this conversation in the Annual forum...

 

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