View previous topic | View next topic

Fans

Page 1 of 3
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next

Molly Cule
287516.  Fri Feb 29, 2008 10:00 am Reply with quote



An alluvial fan, xinjiang province, china.
Not for any reason other than it's a cool photo. Which I need to make smaller but not sure how..

**edit** smaller image found

 
eggshaped
308060.  Tue Apr 01, 2008 5:55 am Reply with quote

[sporting] fans:

Doesn't really fit here, but it's a good fact. The LA Dodgers were
once called the Brooklyn Bridegrooms; the name was given to them
originally by the press who noticed that a number of their players
got married around the same time.

They were also known as the Brooklyn Superbas and the Brooklyn
Trolley Dodgers; the latter due to the fact that their fans had to
Dodge the trolleys that crisscrossed Brooklyn in the early 20th
century.

http://www.sportsecyclopedia.com/nl/bdodgers/brooklyn.html

 
eggshaped
309798.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 7:30 am Reply with quote

re: the Language of the Fan.

I reckon we'll probably use this at some stage, though in the fire forum, Flash quotes wiki as saying that the language was a marketing ploy developed in the 18th century.

I have two fan books here, one from the V&A, and both accept the language as fact, though the more authoritative says:

"It is unlikely that any complex code could be agreed and conveyed to a lover".

But then goes on to quote this, from 1764:

Quote:
My sister, examining me, was highly satisfied with my appearace, only admonishing me to use my fan gracefully, for said she, 'there is a whole language in the fan, With it the woman of fashion can express Disdain, Love, Indifference, encouragement and so on'


I'm not saying it is definitely true; but the wiki is uncitationed.

s:
Fans - Victoria and Albert Museum, Hart & Taylor
A collectors guide to fans, de Vere Green (CGF)

 
eggshaped
309954.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:23 am Reply with quote

In early China, fans were used to blow dust off chariot wheels in order to stop it getting in the eyes of drivers,

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309955.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:23 am Reply with quote

The word "fan" comes from the Latin "vannus" which was a fan-shapped implement used to winnow grain.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309957.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:25 am Reply with quote

The roman fly-flap fan was made from peacock's feathers.

Link to PEACOCK GEN IG

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309959.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:25 am Reply with quote

The Egyptians and Japananese went to war displaying coloured fans to show their allegience and military divisions.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309960.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:27 am Reply with quote

Japanese battle fans were weapons. They were for close-combat use and were held like table-tennis bats and used with flicks of the wrist.

The samorai used them quite a bit, here's one:



s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309964.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:30 am Reply with quote

The japanese tea fan should not be used to cool one down, it is for the transportation of cakes only.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309966.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:31 am Reply with quote

Chinese album-fans were written on, and used to record contemporary history.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309967.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:32 am Reply with quote

In chinese tea ceremonies, once the tea is finished, the host will invite his guests to fan themselves. They will cuncur but with great gravitas.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309968.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:33 am Reply with quote

Fans are traditional NEw Years gifts in Japan. The shape is regarded as an emblem of life.

s: CGF

 
eggshaped
309970.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:34 am Reply with quote

A dagger fan, was a Japanese invention that looked a bit like a folded fan but was actually a deadly weapon. For this reason, Japanese fans would often not close fully - to show that they were benign.

s: CGF

 
Flash
309978.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:40 am Reply with quote

Quote:
in the fire forum

Perversely - sorry.

Yes, we'll see what Molly says when she gets back from the fan museum. Irrespective of whether it's genuine C18th or not, I think it's usable and we can treat it as a debatable point. I like the quote you give above, but I don't think it's a clincher because it might just be referring to a generally coquettish use of the fan, the way one might talk about the language of the eyelashes or something (and not a code of explicit meanings).

My doubts weren't just based on the wiki entry - there's quite a lot out there on the subject, plus it seems improbable on the face of it that these coy young things would have been semaphoring improper messages across crowded rooms in a generally-known code.

 
eggshaped
309990.  Thu Apr 03, 2008 10:58 am Reply with quote

I suppose you're right. Though perhaps both are right, it could have been an advertising campaign AND something which was actually used. Both camps tend to agree on the dates.

Perhaps it was invented by an 18th century marketing executive and taken up by young ladies. Or perhaps some kind of signalling was in place, which was then codified by the men in suits.

Or maybe I'm clutching at straws.

 

Page 1 of 3
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group