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Scottish money isn't real

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ej159
286040.  Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:24 pm Reply with quote

Contrary to popular belief, Scottish banknotes aren't legal tender in England more bizarrely they aren't even legal tender in Scotland. To add to the confusion even English banknotes are not legal tender in Scotland.

I thought it was odd. Admittedly it came from wikipedia but I have no reason to doubt it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknotes_of_the_pound_sterling#Scotland

Does anyone have evidence against this?

 
suze
286066.  Wed Feb 27, 2008 6:05 pm Reply with quote

We've done this one a couple times, so to summarise.

The term "legal tender" is largely misunderstood - it is not the case that bills which are not legal tender are in any way "not real money" (in so far as coins and bills are actually money at all).

What is the case is that if I owe you money and offer to pay it to you in bills which are legal tender, it then becomes your problem if you won't accept it - i.e. you've lost the right to sue me over the money I owe you. If I offer to pay you in something other than legal tender and you don't accept it and walk away, you still have the right to claim that I owe you money.

But when, for instance, you buy a book in a bookstore, you are not settling a debt - and the storekeeper can accept or not accept whatever form of payment he cares to. For sure, there are shops in England which refuse payment in Scottish bills - but if their explanation for this is "they aren't legal tender", you'd be quite in order to say "so what". In that situation, the real explanation for the refusal is "we don't want to take that funny Scottish stuff", and such refusal is entirely allowed. (A few Scottish MPs have muttered about trying to change that, but it won't happen.)

As it happens, no bills - whether Scottish, English, or Mongolian - have the status of legal tender in Scotland. And since they are nowhere legal tender, but are considered to be "reasonable payment" when this matter has come up in the Scottish courts, one could attempt to argue that Scottish bills are actually cheques.

Bank of England bills are legal tender in England and Wales.


Among others, see post 39225 and the discussion following.

 
djgordy
286084.  Wed Feb 27, 2008 7:07 pm Reply with quote

ej159 wrote:
Admittedly it came from wikipedia but I have no reason to doubt it:


One might think that the very fact that something is on Wikipedia is, in itself, reason enough for doubting it.

 
smiley_face
286115.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:14 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
But when, for instance, you buy a book in a bookstore

It's a bookshop, suze, a bookshop.

 
Tas
286166.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 4:36 am Reply with quote

*chuckles*

Some North-Americanisms will never really catch on with some people (myself included, I might add).

:-)

Tas

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
286214.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:29 am Reply with quote

smiley_face wrote:
suze wrote:
But when, for instance, you buy a book in a bookstore

It's a bookshop, suze, a bookshop.


lol ;-)

 
mckeonj
286220.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:33 am Reply with quote

At the back of the bookshop (where they sell books) is the bookstore (where they store the books).

 
suze
286346.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:00 am Reply with quote

Yea, OK OK ...

No one has pulled me up on the other Americanism used throughout that post though, and if anything I'd have thought it more likely to confuse speakers of "British English".

For "bills", read "banknotes".

 
Zaphod Beeblebrox
286394.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:28 am Reply with quote

Is that an Americanism? I thought it was an accepted term this side of the pond...

 
AndyMcH
286414.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:48 am Reply with quote

I have never heard "A 10 pound bill" - it would be far more common to hear "10 pound note"

 
itch
286424.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:55 am Reply with quote

Well I work damn hard for my money and woe betide anyone who tells me it's not good enough! Refusing Scottish notes is nothing less than snobbery! I've had a few English shopkeepers tell me "there are more fake Scottish notes going round". Well how do they know? What evidence do they have to back this statement. None, would be my guess. Like I said - snobs the lot of them!

 
AndyMcH
286443.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 8:04 am Reply with quote

To defend the refusal of scottish notes....

I am Scottish myself, but in the pub I used to help run we decided not to take scottish money as we had been told that there were a lot of forgeries around at the time, and it was easy to pass them off onto shops and pubs because not many staff new what they were meant to look like, especially as all the different banks have their own notes.

 
djgordy
286572.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:03 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
At the back of the bookshop (where they sell books) is the bookstore (where they store the books).


No, that would be the stockroom.

 
itch
286613.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:52 am Reply with quote

TubewayAndy wrote:
To defend the refusal of scottish notes....

I am Scottish myself, but in the pub I used to help run we decided not to take scottish money as we had been told that there were a lot of forgeries around at the time, and it was easy to pass them off onto shops and pubs because not many staff new what they were meant to look like, especially as all the different banks have their own notes.


I suppose with the differences in notes from all the banks it can be hard to tell the fakes but don't most places have a UV light or a magic pen of some sort? How do you tell when an English note is fake? The funny thing is when you try to spend a pound note in England (it's only the clydesdale bank who still make them). Most people will look at you like you've tried to pay with buttons lol :-P

 
PDR
286614.  Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:52 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
At the back of the bookshop (where they sell books) is the bookstore (where they store the books).


Only in the old-fashioned, inefficient ones. Modern, low-overheads business practices would see the books delivered on a "Just in time, minimum inventory" system wherein the books were unpacked and put on the shelves as soon as they were received at the shop, with no costly "holding pen" bteween the wholesaler and the retail opportunity site.

:0)

PDR

 

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