View previous topic | View next topic

Fog

Page 1 of 1

MatC
284463.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 8:48 am Reply with quote

In 18th century USA, “a popular euphemism [for a drink] was antifogmatic, a drink taken on the pretext that it counteracted the bad effects of foggy weather [on the health].”

S: Verbatim magazine, vol. XXX, No. 4

 
MatC
290885.  Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:06 pm Reply with quote

In “Lark Rise” by Flora Thompson, the Rector was “a pale, thin wraith of a man, who in foggy weather wore a respirator, which looked like a heavy black moustache.”

I can’t find a pic of late 19th century respirator, but it could make a good “what-would-you-do-with-this” prop for the panel, if we could get hold of one.

Link: Face

 
Flash
290930.  Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:34 pm Reply with quote

One of our supporters on the outer forums (Grizzly) sent me this:
Quote:
A few years ago I watched an episode of Eye of the Storm (presented by Richard Madeley of all people) which made the claim that fog causes a greater number of deaths and injuries in the UK that any other type of weather, largely through road traffic accidents. Since it first aired in the mid 90's I haven't been able to track down any source for the claim and searches online haven't yielded anything.

The met office experts should be able to verify or disprove the claim fairly easily. This is their contact information: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporate/pressoffice/mediacentre.html

Hopefully if it is true then it should lend itself to a fairly simple question. Most people would expect storms, winds, floods and such extreme weather to be the main cause of fatalities.

Simple, perhaps, though not strong in other respects. Still, there it is.

 
Frederick The Monk
290943.  Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:53 pm Reply with quote

Fog used to mean fat:

In stead of firme substance the bodie is ouercharged with a counterfette kind of fatte, and hydropical fogge, which beareth shewe of good habite.
Timothy Bright A treatise of melancholie 1586

 
Flash
295225.  Thu Mar 13, 2008 7:31 am Reply with quote

We inadvertently started a second Fog thread:
Quote:
WB:
Apparently Fog is just a denser version of Mist. If visibility is less than one kilometre it's foggy, between one and two kilometres it's misty.

CloudsRUs.com

Flash:
So:

Q: What's the difference between fog and mist?


A: About a kilometre.

An OK Gen Ig question if there's some interesting stuff to back it up.

 
Jenny
298198.  Tue Mar 18, 2008 3:15 pm Reply with quote

That's interesting Fred - throws a light on Hamlet's 'Oh that this too, too solid flesh would melt, thaw, and resolve itself into a dew.'

Fat Hamlet rather than sullied Hamlet, then?

 
MatC
345034.  Mon May 26, 2008 4:51 am Reply with quote

"Vog" is volcanic fog - quite a problem in some parts, it seems:

http://www.konaweb.com/vog/index.shtml

 
Jenny
345164.  Mon May 26, 2008 10:12 am Reply with quote

We saw quite a lot of that when we were on Kauai - although apparently it doesn't always blow in that direction. Considering the distance from the big island, it's interesting that it gets that far.

 
Flash
345168.  Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am Reply with quote

Stephen was in Hawaii just before we started this series, and he mentioned vog in one of the early recordings.

 
grizzly
639061.  Sat Nov 21, 2009 3:57 pm Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
One of our supporters on the outer forums (Grizzly) sent me this:
Quote:
A few years ago I watched an episode of Eye of the Storm (presented by Richard Madeley of all people) which made the claim that fog causes a greater number of deaths and injuries in the UK that any other type of weather, largely through road traffic accidents. Since it first aired in the mid 90's I haven't been able to track down any source for the claim and searches online haven't yielded anything.

The met office experts should be able to verify or disprove the claim fairly easily. This is their contact information: http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporate/pressoffice/mediacentre.html

Hopefully if it is true then it should lend itself to a fairly simple question. Most people would expect storms, winds, floods and such extreme weather to be the main cause of fatalities.

Simple, perhaps, though not strong in other respects. Still, there it is.


Since this question was used on the show in the F series I have been very merrily mentioning to people the question, feeling somewhat proud of what I had stumbled upon. I've probably tested the question on a good twenty or thirty people at different times and normally I would get the klaxons like "storms" etc and I was quite content to set them right. However, last week someone mentioned a new one which made me stop in my tracks because "Fog" is very clearly wrong.

Each year in the UK an average of 1,822 people die as a result of skin cancer, the majority of these being malignant melanoma caused by sun burn (here). Although there are more road deaths per year (2,538 in 2008, here) only a small proportion of those are from accidents in which fog played a part. Sunshine is by far the most deadly type of weather in the UK. Not fog.

 
Sadurian Mike
639093.  Sat Nov 21, 2009 5:25 pm Reply with quote

Interesting. Is UV radiation really "weather", though? I know that the sun is obviously a major player in the climate and that we have "sunny" weather, but we also have UV radiation in cold weather and so on.

It is probably down to interpretation of what actually constitutes "weather".

 
eggshaped
639106.  Sat Nov 21, 2009 6:10 pm Reply with quote

Ignoring Mike for the time being (I'm sure he's used to it) I like "sunny" as an answer. Perhaps one to revisit at some stage? Maybe under H for holidays?

 
Sadurian Mike
639111.  Sat Nov 21, 2009 6:23 pm Reply with quote

eggshaped wrote:
Ignoring Mike for the time being (I'm sure he's used to it)

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group