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Efros
282949.  Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:03 pm Reply with quote

I would take issue with that, larger cut pieces of potato will take longer to cook than smaller, when I make mash I always cut my potatoes small to speed the cooking time.

 
Sadurian Mike
282992.  Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:11 pm Reply with quote

I also cut them smaller.

Coming up with a mathematical formula to determine the cooking time is forgetting:

a. People like potatoes cooked to different levels of softness, and especially when they are to put for different uses.

b. Different varieties take different time.

c. Some damn fool (that'll be me) will keep lifting the lid to poke them with a fork, thus releasing the steam and lengthening the cooking time.

d. Sometimes you really don't need to know exactly how long it'll take!

 
dr.bob
284193.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 5:36 am Reply with quote

Hypnobabe wrote:
All potatoes take the same amount of time to cook, no matter if they're big or small ones.


Based on personal experience, I'd say that was nonsense. I've had a pan full of different sized new potatoes, and the smaller ones are ready while the larger ones are still hard.

Still, it should be simple enough to test out for sure.

 
CB27
284476.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 8:59 am Reply with quote

Q. Why did the Dutch eat purple carrots?

The answer is that until 300 hundred years ago the common carrot around Europe was more likely to be purple, though other colours existed. The Dutch, at a time when the colour orange was really becoming a national issue (don't forget this is the time of William III of Britain), and in an attempt to make yellow carrots less bitter, created an orange coloured carrot which became popular worlwide and is the type we now commonly use.

Other common colours of carrots include Yellow, which contain xanthophylls that acts like beta-carotene in helping eyesight (it's not a complete myth), but is also thought to be useful in preventing lung tumours. Purple carrots contain anthrocyanins, very effective antioxidants, and also good at slowing dangerous blood clotting. Red carrots contain lycopene (which you find in tomatoes and water melons) which help against heart disease and prostate tumours. White carrots contain phyto chemicals which are still being studied.

 
Sebastian flyte
284501.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:38 am Reply with quote

I'm eating a few prawn cocktail tapioca snacks a bit like skips but sainsburys own ones, it actually says on the bag: 'high in monounsaturated fats. These healthier fats may help lower blood cholesterol levels, which may in turn maintain a healthy heart'. So is it saying that it is healthier for me to eat these than not to eat these?

 
CB27
284581.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 12:10 pm Reply with quote

That's what they want you to consciously believe, but what they're really saying that they are a healthier option that chips cooked in the same way, but with different oils.

Butter and margarine are similar in calories, the difference is that butter is higher in saturated fats, while margarine generally has more unsaturated fats. Equally, some oils have different qualities to them and are therefore marketed as healthier for you.

 
Sebastian flyte
284642.  Mon Feb 25, 2008 1:40 pm Reply with quote

CB27 wrote:
That's what they want you to consciously believe, but what they're really saying that they are a healthier option that chips cooked in the same way, but with different oils.

Butter and margarine are similar in calories, the difference is that butter is higher in saturated fats, while margarine generally has more unsaturated fats. Equally, some oils have different qualities to them and are therefore marketed as healthier for you.


I wouldn't have thought that they would be allowed to be so misleading on the packaging though, I didn't actually believe that they would be healthy but it does imply an actual health benefit from eating the crisps! So mad.

 
dr.bob
284905.  Tue Feb 26, 2008 4:51 am Reply with quote

I suggest you watch tonight's Horizon on BBC2.

Quote:
it's almost impossible to find a product in the supermarket today that doesn't come with impressive claims...scientific claims...with an inflated price tag to match. Are they oversold? Or are they worth the extra cash?

 
Efros
284953.  Tue Feb 26, 2008 5:50 am Reply with quote

Going on her past performance with cosmetics, she'll annihilate them!

 
CB27
291992.  Fri Mar 07, 2008 8:40 am Reply with quote

Q. Did Saddam Hussein have a Bounty on him when he was captured?

Well, you know it's a trick question and the answer is therefore no.

What people remember is that Saddam was found hiding in a hole in the ground, but that was when the farm he was staying in was captured, he had been staying in a small mud brick hut on the farm which had a small bedroom, a makeshift kitchen, but no loo.

In the kitchen they found several Bounty chocolate bars, some hot dogs and a can of 7up (he was a healthy eater it seems). So the answer is he didn't have a Bounty on him when he was captured, but there were some in the kitchen :)

This was actually reported quite a lot at the time, but forgotten by most people, so here's one link to show you the news at the time: news report.

 
xxvii
310993.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:01 am Reply with quote

Here's one that may be too well known (and may even have appeared on the show, there are a few episodes I havn't seen recently...) but quite interesting anyway!

Q: How would you stuff a camel?

(cue rude jokes, much to the amusement of audience!)

A: There is actually a recipe that was published in a book, "International Cuisine" by Californian Home Economics Teachers for "Stuffed Camel" as can be seen here:



There is debate as to whether or not the recipe is a wind-up, but it exists nonetheless, and would at the very least provide a quick couple of jokes in a food-based show.

 
xxvii
311002.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:12 am Reply with quote

Also, one for a penalty -

Q: What is sushi?

A: Not raw fish - the word is actually a reference to the vinagered rice that forms the base of many sushi dishes. Furthermore, sushi does not necessarily have to include raw fish - ingredients such as crab, eel and shrimp are cooked before serving, and of course there are vegetable sushi dishes as well, still falling under the all-encompassing 'Sushi' tag.

 
CB27
311042.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:37 am Reply with quote

Huh, I always assumed Sushi meant the sea week casing, cos even veggie sushi tends to have that, you've just blown that notion apart :)

As for that camel recipe, I'd seen it before, and there's also an elephant one that goes:

Ingredients

1 Elephant
10 Warthog
100 kilogram tomatoes
half ton potatoes
2 bags onions
100 kilogram salt
1 wheelbarrow onions (heaped)
10 liter vinegar
20 liter chutney
4 Guineafowl

Method

Hunt the elephant, warthog and guineafowl. Hang guineafowl to ripen. Cut elephant into edible chunks, (will take about a month). Boil the warthog with other ingredients (except guineafowl) till nice and juicy. Now boil elephant chunks over high flames till tender. (will take about 4 weeks) and add everything together. Boil for another 5 to 7 days.

Produces about 3,500 helpings.

Note: If the above isn't enough, add the guineafowl as well.

 
xxvii
311060.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 10:57 am Reply with quote

I saw the elephant one too, but it's definately a wind-up, while the camel one is unconfirmed :) Would have been good for the 'E' series though! "there's an elephant in your dinner..."

Incidentally, the seaweed paper in sushi is called "nori" and the raw fish "sashimi" ;)

 
Efros
311078.  Sat Apr 05, 2008 11:29 am Reply with quote

The menu from the infamous meal during the siege of Paris




the only had gruyere on the cheese board, barbarians!

 

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