View previous topic | View next topic

Kornukopia - thread for miskellaneous K subjekts.

Page 7 of 14
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 6, 7, 8 ... 12, 13, 14  Next

suze
936980.  Mon Sep 03, 2012 6:00 pm Reply with quote

Readily available in our Tesco, and there's always a bottle in our pantry.

Can't say that I've ever used it in cooking, but husband does. Notably, his legendary burger recipe uses it. In Tesco, he thinks you'll probably find it next to Worcestershire sauce.

 
CB27
936984.  Mon Sep 03, 2012 6:14 pm Reply with quote

I usually shop in Asda, and out of all the supermarkets, guess which one doesn't sell it :)

There's a medium sized Tesco nearby, so I might pop in there.

I used to use it for burgers as well, it's good for flavouring minced meat.

 
MossRomaLeveneAaronow
937655.  Fri Sep 07, 2012 10:24 am Reply with quote

I must admit to never having tried a dollop of it, but I'm certainly very keen to do so if I come across some.

 
Spud McLaren
937693.  Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:00 pm Reply with quote

It doesn't come in dollops (oo-er, missus), as it's quite runny - like Worcestershire sauce in consistency.

 
suze
937703.  Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:51 pm Reply with quote

On its own, you might not like the taste in any case - it's nearly as salty as soy sauce and nearly as strong as Worcestershire sauce (although without the mouldy fish). If you're thinking that tomato ketchup tastes mainly of sugar and vinegar and not really of tomatoes, well mushroom ketchup is not similar.

Mushroom ketchup is a cooking ingredient rather than a condiment. Used mainly with beef, but it would probably work with any red meat.

 
CB27
937761.  Sat Sep 08, 2012 8:24 am Reply with quote

It's supposed to be good with game if IIRC, but as I'm not a fan of game, I've never tried it.

 
Spud McLaren
937866.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 3:34 am Reply with quote

Aaaanyway...

Akiyoshi Kitaoka's webpage is a little sparse - better to let his work and collections speak for themselves.

Now wondering whether this K deserves its own thread. I think I'll start one, as some of the explanations for the illusions are QI.

 
Oceans Edge
937956.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 12:15 pm Reply with quote

Kahlil Gibran - Lebanese-American poet, is the third best selling poet of all time, after Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu

 
Spud McLaren
937998.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:06 pm Reply with quote



Ouch.

That's the Koch snowflake.
"The Koch snowflake can be constructed by starting with an equilateral triangle, then recursively altering each line segment as follows:

divide the line segment into three segments of equal length.
draw an equilateral triangle that has the middle segment from step 1 as its base and points outward.
remove the line segment that is the base of the triangle from step 2.

After one iteration of this process, the resulting shape is the outline of a hexagram.

The Koch snowflake is the limit approached as the above steps are followed over and over again. The Koch curve originally described by Koch is constructed with only one of the three sides of the original triangle. In other words, three Koch curves make a Koch snowflake."

- from the linked Wiki article.

 
Spud McLaren
938001.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:22 pm Reply with quote

The Kock pouch. Not what it says on the tin.

 
Spud McLaren
938009.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:33 pm Reply with quote

Koogle - the Google designed to crash on Saturdays.

 
Spud McLaren
938012.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 6:39 pm Reply with quote

Want to know the difference between knismesis and gargalesis? Want no longer.

 
Spud McLaren
938014.  Sun Sep 09, 2012 7:05 pm Reply with quote

Knoydart, an area of Scotland containing Britains'most remote mainland pub, may as well be an island - it has 7 miles of tarmacced road, but they aren't connected to the rest of the UK road system.

 
Spud McLaren
938141.  Mon Sep 10, 2012 3:37 pm Reply with quote

The name Kampala, indiginous-sounding though it is, is allegedly a back-formation from English.

"Mutesa I, the Kabaka (king) of Buganda, had chosen the area that was to become Kampala as one of his favorite hunting grounds. The area was made up of hills and wetlands. It was an ideal breeding ground for various game, particularly a species of antelope, the impala (Aepyceros melampus). When the British arrived in the area they called one of the hills 'The Hill of the Impala' due to the large presence of impala. The native Baganda used this reference in their local dialect (Luganda) - 'Akasozi K'empala. It is worth noting that it is not unusual for Luganda to adopt the soundings of English words into the language - for example a car in Luganda is 'emotoka’ (a motor car). So K'empala formally became 'Kampala' with repeated usage, and when the British colonial rulers needed a name for the city they adopted this reference." - from the linked Wiki page.

 
Moosh
938166.  Mon Sep 10, 2012 4:50 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:


Ouch.

That's the Koch snowflake.
"The Koch snowflake can be constructed by starting with an equilateral triangle, then recursively altering each line segment as follows:

divide the line segment into three segments of equal length.
draw an equilateral triangle that has the middle segment from step 1 as its base and points outward.
remove the line segment that is the base of the triangle from step 2.

After one iteration of this process, the resulting shape is the outline of a hexagram.

The Koch snowflake is the limit approached as the above steps are followed over and over again. The Koch curve originally described by Koch is constructed with only one of the three sides of the original triangle. In other words, three Koch curves make a Koch snowflake."

- from the linked Wiki article.


On an interesting note, although the perimeter of the Koch snowflake is infinite in length, the area is merely 1.6 times the area of the triangle that you start with.

 

Page 7 of 14
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 6, 7, 8 ... 12, 13, 14  Next

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group