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Kornukopia - thread for miskellaneous K subjekts.

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Spud McLaren
934835.  Fri Aug 24, 2012 7:46 am Reply with quote

Buggrit...

I ought to have known.

 
Spud McLaren
934853.  Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:01 am Reply with quote

I have often wondered what was the origin of the word kibosh, as in Belgium Put The Kibosh On The Kaiser*. Well, it seems that I wasn't the only one.

So...Nobody Knows.

* first recording here, from 1915 - a little premature, I'd suggest.

 
Spud McLaren
934890.  Fri Aug 24, 2012 11:56 am Reply with quote

Anyone here ever suffered, if that's the word, from Kundalini syndrome?

 
Spud McLaren
935037.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:41 am Reply with quote

The Khonds.

No, not an obscure and embarrassing tropical disease, but a group of Indian tribes around Orissa and Srikakulam. Apparently, "The Khonds became notorious on the British occupation of their district about 1835 for the prevalence and cruelty of the human sacrifices they practiced." - from the linked article.

 
Spud McLaren
935038.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:48 am Reply with quote

Ever fancied trying an exotic Turkish dish? How about kumpir?

I bet it tastes quite familiar...


... as might kapusta and krumpli*.


* Hungarian: potatoes.

 
Spud McLaren
935041.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:56 am Reply with quote

For all you crafters out there, there's Kumihimo, a Japanese braiding art.

You can make your own black belt...

 
Spud McLaren
935049.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 10:31 am Reply with quote

Q: Work by which major painter saw front-line service in WWI?

A: Paul Klee.
"In 1916, he joined the German war effort, but with behind the scenes maneuvering by his father, Klee was spared serving at the front and ended up painting camouflage on airplanes and working as a clerk."
- Wiki

It's a direct quotation, otherwise I'd have corrected manoeuvring.

"manoeuvring - present participle of ma·neu·ver (Verb)" - The Free Dictionary.

Aaaargh.

 
Spud McLaren
935060.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 11:11 am Reply with quote

The Klondike Commies,

OK, it's not that Klondike.

But where was Bill Gates alleged to have bought all the eggs in town, had them boiled and fed them to dogs in order to impress a lady?.

OK, so it's not that Bill Gates. The answer is in Dawson City, in the Klondike (yes, that Klondike, this time).

 
mckeonj
935086.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 3:09 pm Reply with quote

Spud McLaren wrote:
I have often wondered what was the origin of the word kibosh, as in Belgium Put The Kibosh On The Kaiser*. Well, it seems that I wasn't the only one.

So...Nobody Knows.

* first recording here, from 1915 - a little premature, I'd suggest.


I think that the derivation from Irish cai baish (= black cap) is quite likely; a couple of other c19 slang words; 'phony' and 'hooligan' have Irish roots
Another fruitful source of British slang words is Hindi/Urdu/Pushti; British soldiery brought them back from service in the British Raj.
Examples are: char wallah kushti bint.
Romany origin is also possible.

 
exnihilo
935089.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 3:20 pm Reply with quote

The OED suggests that it may be Yiddish or 'Anglo-Hebraic' but as I'm on my phone I can't readily access the relevant issue of Notes & Queries to read the discussion.

 
Spud McLaren
935091.  Sat Aug 25, 2012 3:25 pm Reply with quote

Kippers and red herring.

 
Spud McLaren
935877.  Tue Aug 28, 2012 5:42 pm Reply with quote

The kerf is the width of a saw cut, determined by the divergence between the left and right teeth of the saw. Kerfing is the process of making saw cuts at intervals along a length of timber so that it can be more easily bent at right-angles to the direction of the cuts. This is often seen inside acoustic musical instruments such as guitars, violins, etc.

 
Spud McLaren
935880.  Tue Aug 28, 2012 6:02 pm Reply with quote

In May 1945, about 30 miles (48 km) east of Klamath Falls, Oregon, a Japanese balloon bomb killed a woman and five children on a church outing. This is said to be the only Japanese-inflicted casualty on the US mainland during the war.

Klamath Falls was originally called Linkville when George Nurse founded the town in 1867, after the Link River on whose falls this city sat; the name was changed to Klamath Falls in 1892, although no falls currently exist.

 
Spud McLaren
936024.  Wed Aug 29, 2012 3:49 pm Reply with quote

Karst and karstification.

Found as a by-blow of "researching" Kastelorizo, a Greek island with a chequored history and interesting customs. "The meaning of its current official name Megisti (Μεγίστη) is "biggest" or "greatest", but at only 11.987 sq km (5 sq miles) in area, it is the smallest of the Dodecanese. The name, however, refers to the fact that it is the largest of the small archipelago." - from the Wiki article. I assume that it means that it's the smallest inhabited island of the Dodecanese.

 
Spud McLaren
936065.  Wed Aug 29, 2012 7:01 pm Reply with quote

Kalamazoo hasn't had a zoo since 1974; despite this it hasn't become known as Kalama*. The Gibson Mandolin - Guitar Co. Ltd. was founded here in 1902.

The town was originally called Bronson - the first white resident named it after himself. It was renamed in 1836 after he was fined for stealing a cherry tree.

* and a good job too, to quote Gilbert & Sullivan. There's enough confusion on that count already -

Kalama
Kalama
Kalama Sutta, which could be the creed for this site
Alara Kalama
Kalama River
Benny Kalama
and so on.

 

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