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Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau

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Celebaelin
668409.  Tue Feb 09, 2010 6:15 am Reply with quote

The Welsh National Anthem

Lyrics:
Cymraeg :
Mae hen wlad fy nhadau yn annwyl i mi
Gwlad beirdd a chantorion enwogion o fri
Ei gwrol ryfelwr, gwlad garwyr tra mad
Tros ryddid collasant eu gwaed.

Gwlad Gwlad,
Pleidiol wyf i'm gwlad,
Tra mor yn fur i'r bur hoff bau
O bydded i'r hen iaith barhau

English:
Land of my Fathers, O land of the free,
A land of poets and minstrels, famed men.
Her brave warriors, patriots much blessed,
It was for freedom that they lost their blood.

Wales! Wales!,
I am devoted to my country.
So long as the sea is a wall to this fair beautiful land,
May the ancient language remain.

The more observant of you will notice that gwlad is translated three different ways in the above but the meaning is clear.

 
britishsm
668443.  Tue Feb 09, 2010 7:47 am Reply with quote

As a Welshman, it should be pointed out that the above is an English version of the Welsh National Anthem, not a translation.

from my Welsh Lessons - Gwlad means a nation (that being the country, the people, the culture etc), which is why it is loosely translated as "Wales".

A chap from The Mumbles, by the name of Nigel Jenkins wrote a phonetic version for the saesnegs, but its pretty hard to sing with a straight face :)

Quote:
my hen laid a haddock, one hand oiled a flea,
glad farts and centurions threw dogs in the sea,
I could stew a hare here and brandish dan's flan,
don's ruddy bog's blocked up with sand.
dad, dad, why don't you oil auntie glad
can whores appear in beer bottle pie,
Oh butter the hens as they fly


(he's even on wiki now! huzzah!!)

B.

 
Celebaelin
668463.  Tue Feb 09, 2010 8:37 am Reply with quote

I can just about manage the pronunciation if I speak the words but as with English the way you say things is different to the way you sing them and there's a learned methodology to that which I don't have in Welsh. I've given it a couple of run throughs but I'm missing a bit still.


Last edited by Celebaelin on Wed Feb 10, 2010 9:24 am; edited 1 time in total

 
BondiTram
668497.  Tue Feb 09, 2010 9:51 am Reply with quote

britishsm wrote:
As a Welshman, it should be pointed out that the above is an English version of the Welsh National Anthem, not a translation.

.


So do you have a direct translation? I am interested because my roots are Welsh, back to 1800 anyway, and the immigrants from Devon quickly founded a Welsh speaking dynasty to the extent that they excluded English and discriminated against a later incomer from Cornwall (they considered her English) who in revenge banished Welsh from her children!
A cousin, now in her 80s, married a Welshman who had been punished for speaking Welsh in his N. Wales school, lost the language and when old and determined to regain his birthright was unable to overcome the difficulties in re-learning.

 
suze
668536.  Tue Feb 09, 2010 12:07 pm Reply with quote

The Wiki page about Mae hen wlad fy nhadau gives several translations, including a literal one.


If you enjoyed that song, you might also like the Breton national anthem Bro gozh ma zadoù.

Ni Breizhiz a galon, karomp hon gwir Vro
Brudet eo an Arvor dre ar bed tro-do
Dispont kreiz ar brezel, hon tadoù ken mat
A skuilhas eviti o gwad

O Breizh, ma Bro me 'gar ma Bro
Tra ma vo 'r mor 'vel mur 'n he zro
Ra vezo digabestr ma Bro

Last year's French cup final was between two Breton teams - En Avant Guingamp beat Rennes 2-1 - and in honour of the occasion, Bro gozh ma zadoù was performed in front of 80,000 Bretons at the Stade de France.


Or the Cornish national anthem Bro goth agan tasow.

Bro goth agan tasow, dha flehes a'th car
Gwlas ker an howlsedhes, pan vro yw dha bar
War oll an norvys 'th on ni scollys a-les
Mes agan kerensa yw dhis

Kernow, Kernow y keryn Kernow
An mor hedra vo yn fos dhis a-dro
'Th on onan hag oll rag Kernow

There's a reference to King Arthur and the Holy Grail in the next verse, which will be obvious if you listen for it. And no, the Cornish rugby fraternity don't sing this one on their trips to Twickenham - they go for The Song of the Western Men (also known as Trelawny).

 
Celebaelin
668818.  Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:58 am Reply with quote

I'm going to have a stab at this, there are other 'easy way to learn' versions on Youtube but here's my offering based on this version as heard

My hairn ulard vun had-eye un anwoil ee-mee
Gulard bire-tha khantoreon1 enwogyon ov-ree
Eye goorol ravelweer2 gulad-garweer tra mard
Tros rarthid3 koklassarnt eye4 gwide

Gulard Gulard!
Pli(-i)dee-ol5 oiv im gulard
Tra more un veer eer beer hoff buy
O buythed eer hen-yithe bar-high

1 kh ~ Greek χ
2 ruvelweer?
3 ruthid?
4 ei?
5 extended to fit the tune

I settled on 'gulard' (like gulag) rather than 'goolard' which is probably closer but sounds a bit laboured. I can't help wondering where that choir is from...

 
Ian Dunn
668936.  Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:41 pm Reply with quote

If we are going to mention the Welsh National Anthem we've got to mention John Redwood's terrible mime of it.

Clip

 
dr.bob
669115.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 6:25 am Reply with quote

Which, of course, lead to the rather wonderful parody of the National Anthem created by Swansea poet Nigel Jenkins for non-Welsh speakers to sing instead. He claims it will make you appear to be singing the right words:

Quote:
My hen laid a haddock, one hand oiled a flea,
Glad farts and centurions threw dogs in the sea,
I could stew a hare here and brandish Dan’s flan,
Don’s ruddy bog’s blocked up with sand.

Dad! Dad! Why don’t you oil Auntie Glad?
Can whores appear in beer bottle pies,
O butter the hens as they fly!

 
BondiTram
669147.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:21 am Reply with quote

Thank you Celebaelin, I have saved that ready for the next Wales match.
Now, what about a true translation of the words?

 
Zebra57
669335.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:07 pm Reply with quote

How "official" are these national anthems? For example many Scots would identify with Scotland the Brave rather than Flower of Scotland.

Does God Save the Queen have any "official" status and if so exactly where?

 
Ian Dunn
669337.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:14 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
Does God Save the Queen have any "official" status and if so exactly where?


Well, one thing is for sure, and it is that God Save the Queen is not England's national anthem. England does not have a national anthem.

 
suze
669384.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 5:38 pm Reply with quote

Zebra57 wrote:
Does God Save the Queen have any "official" status and if so exactly where?


Yes. It is the national anthem of the United Kingdom and of its territories and dependencies. It is also one of two national anthems of Guernsey (jointly with Sarnia Cherie), of Jersey (jointly with Ma Normandie, which is not about Jersey), and of New Zealand (jointly with God defend New Zealand / E ihowa atua). Since 2003, it has not been the national anthem of the Isle of Man.

Apparently it is also the national anthem of Norfolk Island, although this puzzles me. Norfolk Island is a dependency of Australia, so why the national anthem isn't Advance Australia fair I don't know. In any case, the Norfuk actually prefer Come ye blessed (based on Matthew's Gospel) which is also the national anthem of the Pitcairn Islands.

God save the Queen is also the Queen's personal anthem outwith the United Kingdom, so it is performed when she is present in the other countries of which she is Queen (Canada, Australia, and so on).


As for Mae hen wlad fy nhadau, it is not recognised in statute as the national anthem of Wales - but the government of Wales and the royal family both accept its use as such, so it may as well be.

Scotland similarly has no national anthem de jure, and there's no consensus as to what should be regarded as it - at least four songs have been suggested. The Scottish Parliament does have the power to declare one, but as yet has not exercised that power; possibly it plans to wait until 2017 when Flower of Scotland will come out of copyright. At this year's Commonwealth Games, Flower of Scotland will be used. Previously it has been Scotland the Brave since 1958 and Scots wha hae before that.

Northern Ireland has no national anthem of its own; officially it is God save the Queen. At the Commonwealth Games it uses Derry / Londonderry Air (i.e. Danny Boy, but without the words).

The American computer games company Electronic Arts caused a bit of a diplomatic incident a couple years back - in its UEFA Euro 2008 game, the Northern Ireland team comes out to Amhrán na bhFiann. There's a games company in Belfast which says that when it brings out its football game, the USA's team will come out to O Canada ...!

 
Zebra57
669392.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 6:00 pm Reply with quote

"God Save the Queen" is the national anthem of the United Kingdom. Like many aspects of British constitutional life, its official status derives from custom and use, not from Royal Proclamation or Act of Parliament. (Wiki: National Anthem)

If its "official" status derives from custom and use then England could perhaps start to develop an anthem. Land of Hope and Glory is used at the Commonwealth Games any suggestions?

 
Moosh
669395.  Thu Feb 11, 2010 6:13 pm Reply with quote

I think if you want a national anthem for England that really captures the national spirit it'd have to be Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now by The Smiths. Come on everyone!

I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour...

 
Ian Dunn
669441.  Fri Feb 12, 2010 2:24 am Reply with quote

Moosh wrote:
I think if you want a national anthem for England that really captures the national spirit it'd have to be Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now by The Smiths. Come on everyone!

I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour...


Or there is Bill Bailey's own prefered versions, such as "God Save the Queen" played in a jazz style, or "Zippity Do Da" performed in the style of Portishead.

 

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