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mckeonj
586984.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 3:39 pm Reply with quote

heck was often used as a harmless substitute for hell, but is now a amplifier in its own right: "What the heck is he on about?"
Heck or Hecke is a Germanic surname; thus we have 'the Heck process', and 'Hecke algebra'.
Memory tells me that the old Queen Mother, the wife of King George V, she of the invariable toque hat, was Princess Mary of Heck. But where the heck is, or was, Heck?
Wikipedia only tells me that she appears on Jubilee mugs.

 
suze
587010.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 4:12 pm Reply with quote

The etymology of heck is cloudier than it needs to be - some of the major dictionaries say no more than that it's a euphemistic variation of hell.

In fact, it's Scottish - hech is a Scots interjection of surprise or shock, and is ultimately the same word as hey (or heigh).

I've just seen one rather outrageous suggestion on the Interwebs that it's a portmanteau made out of hell and fuck. Nonsense.


As for Mary of Heck, she was in fact Mary of Teck. Teck is a castle in Germany, and Duke of Teck - which Mary's father was - was a courtesy title bestowed upon the son of the Duke of Württemberg.

Even so, she was in no real sense from Teck - Mary was born and raised in London.

 
Sadurian Mike
587023.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 4:19 pm Reply with quote

So the populace of the Duchy of Teck are the Teck support?

 
graytart
587034.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 4:34 pm Reply with quote

There is a store near where I work called Heck's Confectionery. I really must take a piccie one of these days.

 
Bondee
587044.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 4:45 pm Reply with quote

Tim Hecker, an electronic musician and sound artist from Montreal.



Once collaborated with fellow musician Russell Haswell under the name Haswell/Hecker which, I think, has a nice ring to it.

 
Sadurian Mike
587054.  Mon Jul 20, 2009 5:09 pm Reply with quote

A heckler was originally a Scottish flax worker. Even by 1800 they were a powerfully militant and unionised workforce who managed to dicatate a wide range of bonuses and improvements to pay and working conditions.

The heckling shop, where the flax was combed out, was a place of "lively" political debate and when these loud and aggressive debating methods were employed in public and political meetings the word "heckler" became synonymous with someone who used quick wit and incisive interjections to challenge a speaker into letting slip more than he wanted.

 
graytart
587448.  Tue Jul 21, 2009 11:30 am Reply with quote

graytart wrote:
There is a store near where I work called Heck's Confectionery. I really must take a piccie one of these days.




So heck has a confectionery and hell has a kitchen, it's just getting nosh in purgatory and heaven that we have to worry about ;-)

 
Davini994
587495.  Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:43 pm Reply with quote

No problem.

 
Janet H
587613.  Tue Jul 21, 2009 4:17 pm Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
A heckler was originally a Scottish flax worker. Even by 1800 they were a powerfully militant and unionised workforce who managed to dicatate a wide range of bonuses and improvements to pay and working conditions.

The heckling shop, where the flax was combed out, was a place of "lively" political debate and when these loud and aggressive debating methods were employed in public and political meetings the word "heckler" became synonymous with someone who used quick wit and incisive interjections to challenge a speaker into letting slip more than he wanted.


Hey, I learned something new today - thank you

 
Sadurian Mike
587618.  Tue Jul 21, 2009 4:22 pm Reply with quote

 
Hans Mof
589870.  Sun Jul 26, 2009 9:40 am Reply with quote

mckeonj wrote:
Heck or Hecke is a Germanic surname; thus we have 'the Heck process', and 'Hecke algebra'.


The German word Hecke translates as hedge. The word is related to French haie and Dutch heg (or in the name The Hague). All of these words stem from the root hag. As a verb it usually means to protect, to shelter or to nourish.

The German word for witch or hag is Hexe. It derives from Hecke referring to someone sitting on a hedge, one leg in this world the other leg in a world of mysticism.

 
Sadurian Mike
589871.  Sun Jul 26, 2009 9:41 am Reply with quote

Hans Mof wrote:
referring to someone sitting on a hedge, one leg in this world the other leg in a world of mysticism.

And small birds nesting in your knickers.

 
Janet H
589872.  Sun Jul 26, 2009 9:43 am Reply with quote

Bloomers, I would have thought.

Aunti Mary had a canary..................

 
Sadurian Mike
589874.  Sun Jul 26, 2009 9:44 am Reply with quote

Okay, small bloomers nesting in your knickers.

 
PDR
589876.  Sun Jul 26, 2009 9:55 am Reply with quote

Sadurian Mike wrote:
Hans Mof wrote:
referring to someone sitting on a hedge, one leg in this world the other leg in a world of mysticism.

And small birds nesting in your knickers.


Thrushes?

PDR

 

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