View previous topic | View next topic

Dachshunds

Page 1 of 1

Flash
50500.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:31 am Reply with quote

We certainly need a thread for these little fellers. Bred to hunt badgers, according to Mat: post 50496.

 
Flash
50501.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:32 am Reply with quote

And, sure enough, dachs is German for badger.

 
Flash
50505.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:34 am Reply with quote

Quote:
A dachshund is a half-dog high and a dog-and-a-half long.


HL Mencken

 
Flash
50507.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:37 am Reply with quote

Pharaonic proto-dachshund:

 
Flash
50512.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:41 am Reply with quote

Because of their association with Germany dachshunds were sometimes stoned to death on the street during WW1.

Over There: The United States in the Great War, 1917-1918by Byron Farwell

 
Flash
50513.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:46 am Reply with quote

Quote:
This information comes to us from The Canadian Dachshund Lovers web page and the gist is verified by other sources: "The part of the pet dog of Dorothy (played by Judy Garland) in the "Wizard of Oz" was originally scripted for a miniature dachshund named Otto, owned by actress Margaret Hamilton who played the Wicked Witch of the West in the movie. Lingering post-war hostility toward the Germans, however, caused the studio to insist upon the substitution of a Norwich terrier to be called Toto, a dog of then more acceptable British descent."

http://www.wienermania.com/

 
MatC
50516.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 7:53 am Reply with quote

Flash wrote:
Because of their association with Germany dachshunds were sometimes stoned to death on the street during WW1.


"Pebbled to death," surely? Stones would be uber-kill.

 
Gray
50540.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:05 am Reply with quote

It's a risky calculation.

Is that too obscure a joke for the show, d'you think?

 
Flash
50552.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:38 am Reply with quote

If you mean calculus=pebble, it went right over my head.

 
Gray
50607.  Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:34 pm Reply with quote

So it's still in with a chance, then...

 
MatC
50824.  Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:21 am Reply with quote

Speaking of unpatriotic German dogs, it’s odd that Jane - the morale-boosting Daily
Mirror strip cartoon heroine of World War Two - had, as her constant companion, a Dachshund called Fritz. I wonder if this was intended to be ironic, or a two fingers to the Germans; or was it simply that society was more grown-up in 1939 than in 1914? Were shops with German names vandalised in WW2?

Jane was originally (when she debuted in 1932) a Bright Young Thing, but she evolved into a plucky spy, who was forever losing her knickers, poor clumsy girl, or getting her blouse ripped.

In 1943, she finally appeared completely starkers for the first time (with Fritz at her feet). The US Army newspaper ‘Round-up’ wrote: “Well, sirs, you can go home now ... Jane peeled a week ago. The British 36th Division immediately gained six miles and the British attacked in the Arakan.”

The strip ended in 1959, when Jane and her fiancee sailed off into the sunset (almost literally; in fact, they rowed) and a love-fuelled retirement.

Sources: www.toonopedia.com/jane.htm
‘The Penguin Book of Comics’ by George Perry & Alan Aldridge (Penguin, 1971).

 
MatC
66512.  Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:56 am Reply with quote

St Petersburg was renamed Petrograd during WW1, as an anti-German gesture. Interestingly, the local Bolshevik Party continued to call itself the Petersburg Committee, as it refused to acknowledge the “chauvinist” change of name.

Source: ‘Kronstadt and Petrograd in 1917’ by F.F. Raskolnikov (New Park, 1982).

 

Page 1 of 1

All times are GMT - 5 Hours


Display posts from previous:   

Search Search Forums

Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group