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The Sinister thread

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suze
212023.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 6:48 am Reply with quote

Lol!

In my experience, men do in fact favor the writing hand for such activity. There is some kind of teenage belief that using the other hand "makes it feel as though someone else is doing it" - but I'm aware that my husband found it awkward, and never made a habit of it.

Mr Grue is quite right of course, us girls often find it convenient to use both hands - but then we have a greater number of "interesting bits" than a man does. Again I can only speak from my own experience, but the hand used (as it were) internally is usually the writing hand.

 
smiley_face
212034.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:16 am Reply with quote

Too much information, Suze!

 
Neotenic
212036.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:19 am Reply with quote

<faints>

I bet you are awesome at rubbing your stomach and patting your head, suze. ;-)

 
samivel
212039.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:24 am Reply with quote

How's that supposed to get you off?

 
Lumpo31
212045.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:27 am Reply with quote

samivel wrote:
How's that supposed to get you off?


Different folks, different strokes!

Lisa

 
dr.bob
212062.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 7:47 am Reply with quote

suze wrote:
There is some kind of teenage belief that using the other hand "makes it feel as though someone else is doing it"


I thought you were supposed to sit on your hand to make it go numb for that. Not that I've ever tried that. It sounds rather awkward and uncomfortable.

suze wrote:
Mr Grue is quite right of course, us girls often find it convenient to use both hands - but then we have a greater number of "interesting bits" than a man does.


Oi! I'll have you know that men have more than one erogenous zone. Given that we've only got two hands, that's plenty enough to keep both occupied.

 
Neotenic
212069.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 8:00 am Reply with quote

<imagines dr bob learning to double-click with his nose>

 
smiley_face
212093.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 8:37 am Reply with quote

PMSL!

 
dr.bob
212118.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 9:37 am Reply with quote

No fair, Neo! How come you made that comment about me, but not about suze?! :)

Vaguely considering putting up a poll to ask after people's habits in this area*, but not sure what the options should be. More precisely, how to get meaningful info out of people who use both hands.

Well, that and the fact I might get moderator Jenny smacking my wrists for bringing the site into disrepute :)


*Pretty good way to collect data, I'd've though, since poll votes are anonymous.

 
Neotenic
212131.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 10:01 am Reply with quote

Well, I'm sure we're all aware that gents are far more likely to rely on visual stimuli than ladies when indulging themselves

;-)

 
Jenny
212176.  Fri Sep 21, 2007 11:01 am Reply with quote

dr.bob wrote:


Well, that and the fact I might get moderator Jenny smacking my wrists for bringing the site into disrepute :)


Well there is that...

And it's definitely in the realms of TMI, I think!

 
Davini994
220812.  Tue Oct 16, 2007 9:10 am Reply with quote

http://sport.guardian.co.uk/columnists/story/0,,2191910,00.html

 
$huttgun
222281.  Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:26 am Reply with quote

i can only liken the left handed experience to the first time i played ms flightsimulator with a joystick. wrenching this way and that with no sense of direction or where and how you might have arrived at your destination.

What intrigues me and i'm sure a cunning linguist could help me out, is the emergence of "left" as a participle of the verb "to Leave",
just as a generalized example, this part of speech often denotes inferiority.

1873 ‘S. COOLIDGE’ What Katy Did i. 7 In almost every large family, there is one of those..left-out children. 1888 W. MORRIS in Mackail Life (1899) II. 211 The town is the queerest left-behind sort of a place. [OED]

Does anyone know how this participle came about? I can't think of many similarly structured verbs in current english, except perhaps "heave, heft", which I've never heard in speech, especially in the UK.

 
suze
222314.  Sun Oct 21, 2007 12:19 pm Reply with quote

It's pure coincidence that the past participle of the verb "to leave" and the word which denotes that side which isn't the right are the same; they are not linked etymlogically.

Oddly enough though, "to leave" didn't originally mean "to depart" - it actually meant rather the opposite, "to remain". This can be traced back to Old English, Old Frisian, Ancient Greek and all manner of other languages - and hence the English "to leave" and the German verb bleiben (to remain) share an etymology. The first citation for "to leave" in the sense of departing is from 1225, and the notion seems to have been that to depart was to leave something behind. It was first used in connection with death, an experience upon which one leaves the Earth behind.

What's more, "leave" (permission to be absent) isn't related. It doesn't mean that one may depart, but that someone dear to one (one's lief) has made a special concession. (Lief is obsolete, but some will be aware that it occurs in the title of an album by Fairport Convention.)

Now, left, the opposite of right. This originally meant something like "weak" or "useless", and only by extension did it come to mean that hand (etc.) with which most people don't write. There was for instance an Old English word lyftadl, which meant "crippled". So, it's no coincidence that the opposite of "left" and the opposite of "wrong" are the same word, since "left" and "wrong" originally had similar meanings.

Finally, the leave / left / left conjugation. I can think of four other verbs with precisely this conjugation:

bereave / bereft / bereft (now only used as an adjective; the past tense of the verb is usually "bereaved"
cleave / cleft / cleft ("to cleave" has two meanings; one goes cleave / cleft / cleft and the other cleave / clove / cloven)
heave / heft / heft (this is obsolete; "heaved" or else heave / hove / hoven are used)
weave / weft / weft (obsolete, either "weaved" or weave / wove / woven are used, but "weft" is a term used in weaving)

 
DELETED
223924.  Fri Oct 26, 2007 4:19 am Reply with quote

DELETED

 

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