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Interlingual Homographs

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Natalie
14338.  Sun Jan 23, 2005 8:09 am Reply with quote

Jenny wrote:
How do you know that those wiggly lines which we think depict the water splashing up aren't actually Arabic words?


They might be, but there's a speech bubble with nothing in it. That's what I was on a bout.

 
Gaazy
16074.  Sun Mar 13, 2005 7:35 am Reply with quote

It was hearing the fervent and committed singing of "Hosanna" in a setting of the Mass on Radio 3 this morning that reminded me of one of the first I.L.s I ever came across. As a youngster it was very difficult to keep a straight face when reading or singing this word, for "hosanna" in North Walian Welsh means "socks".

As is the case with English texts, Hosanna isn't translated from the original Greek<Hebrew in the Bible or in hymns, so to my young eyes I was seeing, in the Gospel according to St Matthew, the words "Socks to the son of David! Socks in the highest!"

There was a hymn, too, we sang in school called "PÍr Hosanna", which means "Sweet Hosanna". Unfortunately it sounds almost exactly like the Welsh for "A pair of socks", so it was not surprising that we sprogs sang the chorus rather more lustily than we did other hymns.

This in turn reminds me that choral singers have their own names for well-known musical works: C H Parry's "Blest Pair of Sirens" is universally known as "Best Pair of Nylons", though there will come a time (maybe it already has) that only historians will know what nylons are. Were.

 
Gray
16080.  Sun Mar 13, 2005 10:06 am Reply with quote

Malashkin's Could I But Express In Song is also known as the Kodaly Buttocks-Pressing Song

 
Jenny
16084.  Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:16 pm Reply with quote

When my daughter sang in John Rutter's Magnificat, they should have sung Magificat, magnificat, anima mea dominus (I think) but what they actually sang when they thought they could get away with it was Magnificat, magnifidog, anima moo-cow, donkey, moose.

 
Beehive
16087.  Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:37 pm Reply with quote

A Gaelic Blessing was always known in our choir as A Garlic Dressing. Those were the days...

 
Gray
16096.  Mon Mar 14, 2005 5:18 am Reply with quote

English madrigals were always a source of amusement, containing as they do a great deal of innuendo, sexual punning and other naughtiness. Take this couplet, from Thomas Morley's 16th Century smash hit Now Is The Month Of Maying, which starts off:
Quote:
Now is the month of Maying
When marry lads are playing!
Fa la la la (etc.)
The Fa-la's are the original 'nudge-nudge, wink-wink, know-what-I-mean, say no more' (etc.)

Or this line:
Quote:
Say, dainty nymphs and speak,
Shall we play barley-break?
'Barley-break' is 'a roll in the hay'. Ah, springtime! (The only pretty ringtime...)

 
Natalie
16113.  Mon Mar 14, 2005 11:56 am Reply with quote

In our school's chamber choir, they are singing "When Daisies Pied", and there is always a giggle or two on the lines:

Strawberries swimming in the cream,
And school-boys playing in the stream.


because they always seem to mix up stream and cream.

 
Jenny
16117.  Mon Mar 14, 2005 3:55 pm Reply with quote

My daughter says that when her school choir sang the song 'In the Mood' they always sang the words 'In the Nude'. (No they weren't naked).

 
raindancer
16135.  Tue Mar 15, 2005 9:44 am Reply with quote

... she sits among the cauliflower and peas...

 
Jessica
16453.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:26 am Reply with quote

Slightly unseasonal, but nonetheless a classic school version of the well-known carol:

While shepherds washed their socks by night,
While watching ITV
The Angel of the Lord came down
And switched to BBC.

 
raindancer
16461.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 8:49 am Reply with quote

Why are angels always portrayed as blonde girls with wings? :)

 
Flash
16467.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 9:06 am Reply with quote

Like Linda McCartney, you mean?

 
Gray
16481.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:00 am Reply with quote

Ba - doom... tish!

 
Beehive
16487.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 11:57 am Reply with quote

Gray wrote:
English madrigals were always a source of amusement, containing as they do a great deal of innuendo, sexual punning and other naughtiness. Take this couplet, from Thomas Morley's 16th Century smash hit Now Is The Month Of Maying, which starts off:
Quote:
Now is the month of Maying
When marry lads are playing!
Fa la la la (etc.)
The Fa-la's are the original 'nudge-nudge, wink-wink, know-what-I-mean, say no more' (etc.)


If you think that's bad, you should hear the madrigal (is it a madrigal?) about a broomstick, My Man John (Had A Thing That Was Long).

 
Frances
16505.  Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:59 pm Reply with quote

Or, of course, there's that old favourite of Nanny Ogg's - 'A Wizard's Staff has a Knob on the End'...

 

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